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Neuroendocrine Control of Peripheral Metabolic Function

Neuropeptidergic Mediators of Spontaneous Physical Activity and Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenesis

Teske J.A.a, d · Billington C.J.c, e · Kotz C.M.a, b, d, e

Author affiliations

aVA Medical Center, bGraduate Program in Neuroscience and cDepartment of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn., dDepartment of Food Science and Nutrition and eMinnesota Obesity Center, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minn., USA

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Neuroendocrinology 2008;87:71–90

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Neuroendocrine Control of Peripheral Metabolic Function

Received: May 11, 2007
Accepted: September 20, 2007
Published online: November 05, 2007
Issue release date: December 2007

Number of Print Pages: 20
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0028-3835 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0194 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEN

Abstract

Lean individuals have high levels of spontaneous physical activity (SPA) and the energy expenditure derived from that activity, termed non-exercise activity thermogenesis or NEAT, appears to protect them from obesity. Conversely, obesity in different human populations is characterized by low levels of SPA and NEAT. Like in humans, elevated SPA in rats appears to protect against obesity: obesity-resistant rats have significantly greater SPA and NEAT than obesity-prone rats. We review the literature on brain mechanisms important in mediating SPA and NEAT. The focus is on neuropeptides, including cholecystokinin, corticotropin-releasing hormone (also known as corticotropin-releasing factor), neuromedin U, neuropeptide Y, leptin, agouti-related protein, orexin-A (also known as hypocretin-1), and ghrelin. We also review information regarding interactions between these neuropeptides and dopamine, a neurotransmitter important in mediating motor function. Finally, we present evidence that elevated signaling of pathways mediating SPA and NEAT may protect against weight gain and obesity.

© 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

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Abstract of Neuroendocrine Control of Peripheral Metabolic Function

Received: May 11, 2007
Accepted: September 20, 2007
Published online: November 05, 2007
Issue release date: December 2007

Number of Print Pages: 20
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Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0028-3835 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0194 (Online)

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