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Original Paper

Epidermal Ceramidase Activity Regulates Epidermal Desquamation via Stratum Corneum Acidification

Houben E.a · Hachem J.P.b · De Paepe K.a · Rogiers V.a

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Toxicology, Dermatocosmetology and Pharmacognosy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and bDepartment of Dermatology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels, Belgium

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Skin Pharmacol Physiol 2008;21:111–118

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: August 21, 2007
Accepted: November 14, 2007
Published online: February 05, 2008
Issue release date: March 2008

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1660-5527 (Print)
eISSN: 1660-5535 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/SPP

Abstract

The acidic pH of the outer surface of the mammalian skin plays several important roles in the epidermal barrier function. The 2 endogenous pathways that are currently known to elicit this acidic pH are the generation of free fatty acids from phospholipids and the exchange of protons for sodium ions by non-energy-dependent sodium-proton exchangers. In this study, we propose a third endogenous pathway, i.e. epidermal ceramidase activity, generating free fatty acids from ceramides. By topical application of N-oleylethanolamine, a well-known ceramidase inhibitor, we could demonstrate a significant increase in the stratum corneum pH and a corresponding decrease in the epidermal free fatty acid content. Moreover, we could show that the resulting change in the apparent skin pH also provoked a delay in early barrier recovery and an increased epidermal desquamation, corresponding to earlier observations made for the already known endogenous mechanisms.

© 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: August 21, 2007
Accepted: November 14, 2007
Published online: February 05, 2008
Issue release date: March 2008

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1660-5527 (Print)
eISSN: 1660-5535 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/SPP


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