Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Original Paper

Incidence of Dementia, Alzheimer Disease, and Vascular Dementia in a Japanese Population: Radiation Effects Research Foundation Adult Health Study

Yamada M.a · Mimori Y.c, d · Kasagi F.b · Miyachi T.c · Ohshita T.c · Sudoh S.c · Ikeda J.c · Matsui K.c · Nakamura S.c · Matsumoto M.c · Fujiwara S.a · Sasaki H.a, e

Author affiliations

Departments of aClinical Studies and bEpidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, and cDepartment of Clinical Neuroscience and Therapeutics, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, dSuiseikai Kajikawa Hospital, eHiroshima Atomic Bomb Casualty Council Health Promotion Center, Hiroshima, Japan

Related Articles for ""

Neuroepidemiology 2008;30:152–160

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: July 21, 2007
Accepted: January 07, 2008
Published online: April 01, 2008
Issue release date: May 2008

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0251-5350 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0208 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NED

Abstract

Objective: To determine the age-, sex-, and subtype-specific incidence of dementia and to assess the effect of education level on the incidence in a Japanese population. Methods: 2,286 dementia-free subjects, aged ≧60 years, were followed for 5.9 years through biennial two-phase examinations. Results: 206 cases of dementia were newly diagnosed based on DSM IV. The incidence per 1,000 person-years was 12.0 for men and 16.6 for women. Based on NINCDS-ADRDA criteria, 80 cases of probable Alzheimer disease (AD) and 50 cases of possible AD were diagnosed. Based on NINDS-AIREN criteria, 36 cases of probable vascular dementia (VaD) and 40 cases of possible VaD were diagnosed. Age and education showed the most statistically significant effects for all dementia. Probable AD showed the most remarkable increase with age and decreased with increasing education level (p = 0.001). Probable VaD showed significant effects of sex (p = 0.033) and sex-age interaction (p = 0.048), but not education (p = 0.26). Conclusion: AD was the predominant type of dementia in this recent incidence study conducted in Japan, suggesting a reduction in VaD and an increase in AD. Age, sex, and education effects differed by dementia subtype.

© 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel


References

  1. Suh GH, Shah A: A review of the epidemiological transition in dementia – cross-national comparisons of the indices related to Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2001;104:4–11.
  2. Shadlen MF, Larson EB, Yukawa M: The epidemiology of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia in Japanese and African-American populations: the search for etiological clues. Neurobiol Aging 2000;21:171–181.
  3. Yamada M, Sasaki H, Mimori Y, Kasagi F, Sudoh S, Ikeda J, Hosoda Y, Nakamura S, Kodama K: Prevalence and risks of dementia in the Japanese population: RERF’s adult health study Hiroshima subjects. Radiation Effects Research Foundation. J Am Geriatr Soc 1999;47:189–195.
  4. Yoshitake T, Kiyohara Y, Kato I, Ohmura T, Iwamoto H, Nakayama K, Ohmori S, Nomiyama K, Kawano H, Ueda K, et al: Incidence and risk factors of vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in a defined elderly Japanese population: the Hisayama Study. Neurology 1995;45:1161–1168.
  5. White L, Petrovitch H, Ross GW, Masaki KH, Abbott RD, Teng EL, Rodriguez BL, Blanchette PL, Havlik RJ, Wergowske G, Chiu D, Foley DJ, Murdaugh C, Curb JD: Prevalence of dementia in older Japanese-American men in Hawaii: the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study. JAMA 1996;276:955–960.
  6. Graves AB, Larson EB, Edland SD, Bowen JD, McCormick WC, McCurry SM, Rice MM, Wenzlow A, Uomoto JM: Prevalence of dementia and its subtypes in the Japanese American population of King County, Washington state. The Kame Project. Am J Epidemiol 1996;144:760–771.
  7. Katzman R: Education and the prevalence of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Neurology 1993;43:13–20.
  8. Rocca WA, Hofman A, Brayne C, Breteler MM, Clarke M, Copeland JR, Dartigues JF, Engedal K, Hagnell O, Heeren TJ, et al: Frequency and distribution of Alzheimer’s disease in Europe: a collaborative study of 1980–1990 prevalence findings. The EURODEM-Prevalence Research Group. Ann Neurol 1991;30:381–390.
  9. Ritchie K, Kildea D, Robine JM: The relationship between age and the prevalence of senile dementia: a meta-analysis of recent data. Int J Epidemiol 1992;21:763–769.
  10. Di Carlo A, Baldereschi M, Amaducci L, Lepore V, Bracco L, Maggi S, Bonaiuto S, Perissinotto E, Scarlato G, Farchi G, Inzitari D: Incidence of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and vascular dementia in Italy: the ILSA Study. J Am Geriatr Soc 2002;50:41–48.
  11. Andersen K, Launer LJ, Dewey ME, Letenneur L, Ott A, Copeland JR, Dartigues JF, Kragh-Sorensen P, Baldereschi M, Brayne C, Lobo A, Martinez-Lage JM, Stijnen T, Hofman A: Gender differences in the incidence of AD and vascular dementia: the EURODEM studies. EURODEM Incidence Research Group. Neurology 1999;53:1992–1997.
  12. Fratiglioni L, Viitanen M, von Strauss E, Tontodonati V, Herlitz A, Winblad B: Very old women at highest risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease: incidence data from the Kungsholmen Project, Stockholm. Neurology 1997;48:132–138.
  13. Lopez-Pousa S, Vilalta-Franch J, Llinas-Regla J, Garre-Olmo J, Roman GC: Incidence of dementia in a rural community in Spain: the Girona cohort study. Neuroepidemiology 2004;23:170–177.
  14. Hebert LE, Scherr PA, McCann JJ, Beckett LA, Evans DA: Is the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease greater for women than for men? Am J Epidemiol 2001;153:132–136.
  15. Kukull WA, Higdon R, Bowen JD, McCormick WC, Teri L, Schellenberg GD, van Belle G, Jolley L, Larson EB: Dementia and Alzheimer disease incidence: a prospective cohort study. Arch Neurol 2002;59:1737–1746.
  16. Edland SD, Rocca WA, Petersen RC, Cha RH, Kokmen E: Dementia and Alzheimer disease incidence rates do not vary by sex in Rochester, Minn. Arch Neurol 2002;59:1589–1593.
  17. Fitzpatrick AL, Kuller LH, Ives DG, Lopez OL, Jagust W, Breitner JC, Jones B, Lyketsos C, Dulberg C: Incidence and prevalence of dementia in the Cardiovascular Health Study. J Am Geriatr Soc 2004;52:195–204.
  18. Ott A, Breteler MM, van Harskamp F, Stijnen T, Hofman A: Incidence and risk of dementia. The Rotterdam Study. Am J Epidemiol 1998;147:574–580.
  19. Ott A, van Rossum CT, van Harskamp F, van de Mheen H, Hofman A, Breteler MM: Education and the incidence of dementia in a large population-based study: the Rotterdam Study. Neurology 1999;52:663–666.
  20. Caamano-Isorna F, Corral M, Montes-Martinez A, Takkouche B: Education and dementia: a meta-analytic study. Neuroepidemiology 2006;26:226–232.
  21. Letenneur L, Launer LJ, Andersen K, Dewey ME, Ott A, Copeland JR, Dartigues JF, Kragh-Sorensen P, Baldereschi M, Brayne C, Lobo A, Martinez-Lage JM, Stijnen T, Hofman A: Education and the risk for Alzheimer’s disease: sex makes a difference. EURODEM pooled analyses. EURODEM Incidence Research Group. Am J Epidemiol 2000;151:1064–1071.
  22. Karp A, Kareholt I, Qiu C, Bellander T, Winblad B, Fratiglioni L: Relation of education and occupation-based socioeconomic status to incident Alzheimer’s disease. Am J Epidemiol 2004;159:175–183.
  23. Paykel ES, Brayne C, Huppert FA, Gill C, Barkley C, Gehlhaar E, Beardsall L, Girling DM, Pollitt P, O’Connor D: Incidence of dementia in a population older than 75 years in the United Kingdom. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1994;51:325–332.
  24. Yamada M, Wong FL, Fujiwara S, Akahoshi M, Suzuki G: Noncancer disease incidence in atomic bomb survivors, 1958–1998. Radiat Res 2004;161:622–632.
  25. Teng EL, Hasegawa K, Homma A, Imai Y, Larson E, Graves A, Sugimoto K, Yamaguchi T, Sasaki H, Chiu D, et al: The Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI): a practical test for cross-cultural epidemiological studies of dementia. Int Psychogeriatr 1994;6:45–58; discussion 62.
  26. Jorm AF, Jacomb PA: The Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE): socio-demographic correlates, reliability, validity and some norms. Psychol Med 1989;19:1015–1022.
  27. Morris JC: The Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR): current version and scoring rules. Neurology 1993;43:2412–2414.
  28. Larson EB MS, Graves AB, et al: Standardization of the clinical diagnosis of the dementia syndrome and its subtypes in a cross-national study: the Ni-Hon-Sea experience. J Gerontol 1998;53A:M313–M319.
  29. American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Washington, American Psychiatric Association, 1994.
  30. McKhann G, Drachman D, Folstein M, Katzman R, Price D, Stadlan EM: Clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease: report of the NINCDS-ADRDA Work Group under the auspices of Department of Health and Human Services Task Force on Alzheimer’s Disease. Neurology 1984;34:939–944.
  31. Roman GC, Tatemichi TK, Erkinjuntti T, Cummings JL, Masdeu JC, Garcia JH, Amaducci L, Orgogozo JM, Brun A, Hofman A, et al: Vascular dementia: diagnostic criteria for research studies. Report of the NINDS-AIREN International Workshop. Neurology 1993;43:250–260.
  32. Wetterling T, Kanitz RD, Borgis KJ: Comparison of different diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia (ADDTC, DSM-IV, ICD-10, NINDS-AIREN). Stroke 1996;27:30–36.
  33. Korczyn AD: Mixed dementia: the most common cause of dementia. Ann NY Acad Sci 2002;977:129–134.
  34. Pasquier F, Leys D: Why are stroke patients prone to develop dementia? J Neurol 1997;244:135–142.
  35. Snowdon DA: Aging and Alzheimer’s disease: lessons from the Nun Study. Gerontologist 1997;37:150–156.
  36. Kawas C, Gray S, Brookmeyer R, Fozard J, Zonderman A: Age-specific incidence rates of Alzheimer’s disease: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Neurology 2000;54:2072–2077.
  37. Kubo M, Kiyohara Y, Kato I, Tanizaki Y, Arima H, Tanaka K, Nakamura H, Okubo K, Iida M: Trends in the incidence, mortality, and survival rate of cardiovascular disease in a Japanese community: the Hisayama study. Stroke 2003;34:2349–2354.
  38. Kiyohara Y, Yoshitake T, Kato I, Ohmura T, Kawano H, Ueda K, Fujishima M: Changing patterns in the prevalence of dementia in a Japanese community: the Hisayama study. Gerontology 1994;40(suppl 2):29–35.
  39. Knopman DS, Parisi JE, Boeve BF, Cha RH, Apaydin H, Salviati A, Edland SD, Rocca WA: Vascular dementia in a population-based autopsy study. Arch Neurol 2003;60:569–575.
  40. Meguro K, Ishii H, Yamaguchi S, Ishizaki J, Shimada M, Sato M, Hashimoto R, Shimada Y, Meguro M, Yamadori A, Sekita Y: Prevalence of dementia and dementing diseases in Japan: the Tajiri project. Arch Neurol 2002;59:1109–1114.
  41. Tanizaki Y, Kiyohara Y, Kato I, Iwamoto H, Nakayama K, Shinohara N, Arima H, Tanaka K, Ibayashi S, Fujishima M: Incidence and risk factors for subtypes of cerebral infarction in a general population: the Hisayama study. Stroke 2000;31:2616–2622.
  42. Kobayashi S, Okada K, Koide H, Bokura H, Yamaguchi S: Subcortical silent brain infarction as a risk factor for clinical stroke. Stroke 1997;28:1932–1939.
  43. Cui R, Iso H, Yamagishi K, Tanigawa T, Imano H, Ohira T, Kitamura A, Sato S, Naito Y, Shimamoto T: Ankle-arm blood pressure index and cardiovascular risk factors in elderly Japanese men. Hypertens Res 2003;26:377–382.
  44. Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare: Brief summary of actual condition survey on diabetes mellitus. Cited 2007 September 13; available from http://www1.mhlw.go.jp/toukei/tounyou/.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: July 21, 2007
Accepted: January 07, 2008
Published online: April 01, 2008
Issue release date: May 2008

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0251-5350 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0208 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NED


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.