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Original Paper

Organization of Ovine Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Immunoreactive Cells and Fibers in the Rat Brain: An Immunohistochemical Study

Swanson L.W. · Sawchenko P.E. · Rivier J. · Vale W.W.

Author affiliations

The Salk Institute for Biological Studies and The Clayton Foundation for Research-California Division, La Jolla, Calif., USA

Related Articles for ""

Neuroendocrinology 1983;36:165–186

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: August 02, 1982
Accepted: September 08, 1982
Published online: March 26, 2008
Issue release date: 1983

Number of Print Pages: 22
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0028-3835 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0194 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEN

Abstract

The distribution of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-immunoreactive cells and fibers has been examined in the brains of normal adult rats, and in the brains of animals that had been pretreated with intraventricular injections of colchicine, or had been adrenalectomized 3-60 days before perfusion. The results suggest that CRF immunoreactivity is localized in at least three functionally distinct systems. First, most of the CRF-stained fibers in the neurohemal zone of the median eminence, which presumably modulate the release of ACTH and β-endorphin from the pituitary, appear to arise in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH). About 2,000 CRF-stained cells are distributed throughout all eight parts of the PVH, although a majority (80%) of the cells are concentrated in the parvocellular division, and a smaller number (about 15%) are found in parts of the magnocellular division in which oxytocinergic cells predominate. This appears to be the only CRF-stained pathway in the brain that is affected (increased staining intensity) by adrenalectomy. Second, a series of cell groups in the basal telencephalon, hypothalamus, and brain stem that are known to play a role in the mediation of autonomic responses contain CRF-stained neurons. These areas, which are interconnected by stained fibers in the medial forebrain bundle and the periventricular system, include the central nucleus of the amygdala, substantia innominata, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, medial and lateral preoptic areas, lateral hypothalamic area, central gray, laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, locus ceruleus, parabrachial nucleus, dorsal vagal complex, and regions containing the Al and A5 catecholamine cell groups. And third, scattered CRF-stained cells are found throughout most areas of the cerebral cortex. Most such cells are confined to layers II and III in the neocortex, and their bipolar shape suggests that they are interneurons. These cells are most common in limbic regions including prefrontal areas, the cingulate gyrus, and areas bordering the rhinal fissure. Scattered immunoreactive cells are also found in dorsal parts of the dentate gyrus and Ammon’s horn. These results suggest that the PVH plays a critical role in the modulation of ACTH and β-endorphin release from the pituitary, and that CRF-containing pathways in the brain are involved in the mediation of autonomic responses.

© 1983 S. Karger AG, Basel


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: August 02, 1982
Accepted: September 08, 1982
Published online: March 26, 2008
Issue release date: 1983

Number of Print Pages: 22
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0028-3835 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0194 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEN


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