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Clinical Study

The Baseline Ratio of Neutrophils to Lymphocytes Is Associated with Patient Prognosis in Advanced Gastric Cancer

Yamanaka T.a · Matsumoto S.b · Teramukai S.c, d · Ishiwata R.d · Nagai Y.d · Fukushima M.b-d

Author affiliations

aInstitute for Clinical Research, National Kyushu Cancer Center, Fukuoka, Departments of bTranslational Clinical Oncology and cClinical Trial Design and Management, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, and dTranslational Research Informatics Center, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe, Japan

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Oncology 2007;73:215–220

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Clinical Study

Received: September 21, 2007
Accepted: September 25, 2007
Published online: April 17, 2008
Issue release date: April 2008

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 0030-2414 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0232 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/OCL

Abstract

Objective: In cancer patients, the balance between neutrophil (N) and lymphocyte (L) cell counts fluctuates with advancing disease. The objective of our study was to determine the prognostic implications of the N/L ratio in the peripheral blood of gastric cancer patients. Methods: Study participants were identified from a prospective cohort of patients with advanced gastric cancer in Japan (n = 1,220). Results: The median baseline N/L was 2.58 (range, 0.63–12.7). Univariate analysis revealed that patients with an N/L ≧2.5 (n = 644) had a significantly poorer prognosis than those with an N/L <2.5 (n = 576; log rank test, p = 0.019 × 10–12). The median survival times for these two groups were 239 (95% confidence interval, CI, 217–251 days) and 363 days (95% CI, 334–406 days), respectively, while the 1-year survival rates were 30 (95% CI, 26–34%) and 50% (95% CI, 45–54%), respectively. A multivariate Cox model established a significant relationship between the N/L ratio and survival (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.52; 95% CI, 1.32–1.75; p = 0.077 × 10–8). Conclusions: These results suggest that the N/L ratio is an independent prognostic factor in advanced gastric cancer. Measurement of this ratio may serve as a clinically accessible and useful biomarker for patient survival.

© 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Clinical Study

Received: September 21, 2007
Accepted: September 25, 2007
Published online: April 17, 2008
Issue release date: April 2008

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 0030-2414 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0232 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/OCL


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