Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Isolation of Distinct Progenitor Stem Cell Populations from Dental Pulp

Waddington R.J. · Youde S.J. · Lee C.P. · Sloan A.J.

Author affiliations

Tissue Engineering and Reparative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK

Related Articles for ""

Cells Tissues Organs 2009;189:268–274

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information












By signing up for MyKarger you will automatically participate in our year-End raffle.
If you Then Do Not wish To participate, please uncheck the following box.

Yes, I wish To participate In the year-End raffle And Get the chance To win some Of our most interesting books, And other attractive prizes.


I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information












By signing up for MyKarger you will automatically participate in our year-End raffle.
If you Then Do Not wish To participate, please uncheck the following box.

Yes, I wish To participate In the year-End raffle And Get the chance To win some Of our most interesting books, And other attractive prizes.


I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: August 14, 2008
Issue release date: December 2008

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1422-6405 (Print)
eISSN: 1422-6421 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CTO

Abstract

The present study compared the cellular characteristics of progenitor stem cell populations present in adult dental pulp, isolated by different methods utilizing 2 different features of stem cell biology. One population expressing high levels of β1 integrin was isolated by preferential selection of adherent cells to fibronectin over 20 min. In an alternative approach, cells expressing the embryonic neural crest cell marker, low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (LANGFR), were selected by magnetic-activated cell sorting. For each method, clonal cell lines were established and expanded in culture. One clone derived via the respective methods was examined for embryonic/progenitor cell markers by immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR. Both clonal populations demonstrated the expression of stro-1 and stained positive for vimentin, demonstrating mesenchymal lineage. Of note, cells selected for LANGFR cells demonstrated the additional expression of CD105 and Notch 2. For both clonal populations, expanded cultures demonstrated the ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. These results would suggest the potential isolation of 2 progenitor cell populations exhibiting different cellular characteristics in terms of their embryonic nature. The potential for both cell populations to derive from a common origin is discussed.

© 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel


References

  1. Amano, S., S. Yamagami, T. Mimura, S. Uchida, S. Yokoo (2006) Corneal stromal and endothelial cell precursors. Cornea. 25(suppl 1): S73–S77.
    External Resources
  2. Bannerman, P., W. Nichols, S. Puhalla, T. Oliver, M. Berman, D. Pleasure (2000) Early migratory rat neural crest cells express functional gap junctions: evidence that neural crest cell survival requires gap junction function. J Neurosci Res 61: 605–615.
  3. Deng, M.J., Y. Jin, J.N. Shi, H.B. Lu, Y. Liu, D.W. He, X. Nie, A.J. Smith (2004) Multilineage differentiation of ectomesenchymal cells isolated from the first branchial arch. Tissue Eng 10: 1597–1606.
  4. Eisenberg, L.M., C.A. Eisenberg (2003) Stem cell plasticity, cell fusion, and transdifferentiation. Birth Defects Res C Embryo Today 69: 209–218.
  5. Gronthos, S., J. Brahim, W. Li, L.W. Fisher, N. Cherman, A. Boyde, P. DenBesten, P.G. Robey, S. Shi (2002) Stem cell properties of human dental pulp stem cells. J Dent Res 81: 531–535.
  6. Hermann, A., R. Gastl, S. Liebau, M.O. Popa, J. Fiedler, B.O. Boehm, M. Maisel, H. Lerche, J. Schwarz, R. Brenner, A. Storch (2004) Efficient generation of neural stem cell-like cells from adult human bone marrow stromal cells. J Cell Sci 117: 4411–4422.
  7. Iohara, K., L. Zheng, M. Ito, A. Tomokiyo, K. Matsushita, M. Nakashima (2006) Side population cells isolated from porcine dental pulp tissue with self-renewal and multipotency for dentinogenesis, chondrogenesis, adipogenesis, and neurogenesis. Stem Cells 24: 2493–2503.
  8. Jensen, U.B., S. Lowell, F.M. Watt (1999) The spatial relationship between stem cells and their progeny in the basal layer of human epidermis: a new view based on whole-mount labelling and lineage analysis. Development 126: 2409–2418.
  9. Jones, P.H., F.M. Watt (1993) Separation of human epidermal stem cells from transit amplifying cells on the basis of differences in integrin function and expression. Cell 73: 713–724.
  10. Kerkis, I., A. Kerkis, D. Dozortsev, G.C. Stukart-Parsons, S.M. Gomes Massironi, L.V. Pereira, A.I. Caplan, H.F. Cerruti (2006) Isolation and characterization of a population of immature dental pulp stem cells expressing OCT-4 and other embryonic stem cell markers. Cells Tissues Organs 184: 105–116.
  11. Kruger, G.M., J.T. Mosher, S. Bixby, N. Joseph, T. Iwashita, S.J. Morrison (2002) Neural crest stem cells persist in the adult gut but undergo changes in self-renewal, neuronal subtype potential, and factor responsiveness. Neuron 35: 657–669.
  12. Laino, G., F. Carinci, A. Graziano, R. d’Aquino, V. Lanza, A. De Rosa, F. Gombos, F. Caruso, L. Guida, R. Rullo, D. Menditti, G. Papaccio (2006) In vitro bone production using stem cells derived from human dental pulp. J Craniofac Surg 17: 511–515.
  13. Laino, G., R. d’Aquino, A. Graziano, V. Lanza, F. Carinci, F. Naro, G. Pirozzi, G. Papaccio (2005) A new population of human adult dental pulp stem cells: a useful source of living autologous fibrous bone tissue (LAB). J Bone Miner Res 20: 1394–1402.
  14. Lovschall, H., M. Tummers, I. Thesleff, E.M. Fuchtbauer, K. Poulsen (2005) Activation of the Notch signaling pathway in response to pulp capping of rat molars. Eur J Oral Sci 113: 312–317.
  15. Miura, M., S. Gronthos, M. Zhao, B. Lu, L.W. Fisher, P.G. Robey, S. Shi (2003) SHED: stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100: 5807–5812.
  16. Pierret, C., K. Spears, J.A. Maruniak, M.D. Kirk (2006) Neural crest as the source of adult stem cells. Stem Cells Dev 15: 286–291.
  17. Prockop, D.J., C.A. Gregory, J.L. Spees (2003) One strategy for cell and gene therapy: harnessing the power of adult stem cells to repair tissues. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100 (suppl 1): 11917–11923.
  18. Rao, M.S., D.J. Anderson (1997) Immortalization and controlled in vitro differentiation of murine multipotent neural crest stem cells. J Neurobiol 32: 722–746.
  19. Scadden D.T. (2006) The stem-cell niche as an entity of action. Nature 441: 1075–1079.
  20. Rutenberg, M.S., T. Hamazaki, A.M. Singh, N. Terada (2004) Stem cell plasticity, beyond alchemy. Int J Hematol 79: 15–21.
  21. Shi, S., S. Gronthos (2003) Perivascular niche of postnatal mesenchymal stem cells in human bone marrow and dental pulp. J Bone Miner Res 18: 696–704.
  22. Sloan, A.J., A.J. Smith (2007) Stem cells and the dental pulp: potential roles in dentine regeneration and repair. Oral Dis 13: 151–157.
  23. Smith, A.J., M. Patel, L. Graham, A.J. Sloan, P.R. Cooper (2005) Dentine regeneration: the role of stem cells and molecular signalling. Oral Biosci Med 2: 127–132.
  24. Techawattanawisal, W., K. Nakahama, M. Komaki, M. Abe, Y. Takagi, I. Morita (2007) Isolation of multipotent stem cells from adult rat periodontal ligament by neurosphere-forming culture system. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 357: 917–923.
  25. Tecles, O., P. Laurent, S. Zygouritsas, A.S. Burger, J. Camps, J. Dejou, I. About (2005) Activation of human dental pulp progenitor/stem cells in response to odontoblast injury. Arch Oral Biol 50: 103–108.
  26. Toma, J.G., M. Akhavan, K.J. Fernandes, F. Barnabe-Heider, A. Sadikot, D.R. Kaplan, F.D. Miller (2001) Isolation of multipotent adult stem cells from the dermis of mammalian skin. Nat Cell Biol 3: 778–784.
  27. Toma, J.G., I.A. McKenzie, D. Bagli, F.D. Miller (2005) Isolation and characterization of multipotent skin-derived precursors from human skin. Stem Cells 23: 727–737.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: August 14, 2008
Issue release date: December 2008

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1422-6405 (Print)
eISSN: 1422-6421 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CTO


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.