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Characterisation and mapping of the human SOX14 gene

Arsic N.a · Rajic T.a · Stanojcic S.a · Goodfellow P.N.b · Stevanovic M.a,b

Author affiliations

aInstitute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); bDepartment of Genetics, Cambridge University, Cambridge (UK)

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Cytogenet Cell Genet 83:139–146 (1998)

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: February 01, 1999
Issue release date: 1998

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

Abstract.

SOX genes comprise a family of genes that are related to the mammalian sex determining gene SRY in the region that encodes the HMG-box domain responsible for the sequence-specific DNA-binding activity. SOX genes encode putative transcriptional regulators implicated in the decision of cell fates during development and the control of diverse developmental processes.

We have cloned and characterised SOX14, a novel member of the human SOX gene family. Based on the HMG-box sequence, human SOX14 is a member of the B subfamily. SOX14 is expressed in human foetal brain, spinal cord and thymus, and like other members of the B subfamily, it might have a role in regulation of nervous system development. While other members of the B subfamily show similarity outside the HMG-box, the regions flanking the HMG box of the human SOX14 gene are unique.

SOX14 has been mapped to human chromosome 3q22→ q23, close to the marker D3S1549. This location places SOX14 within a chromosome interval associated with two distinct syndromes that affect craniofacial development: Blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicantus inversus syndrome and Möbius syndrome.


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: February 01, 1999
Issue release date: 1998

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR


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