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Original Paper

Allergic Sensitization to Bovine β-Lactoglobulin: Comparison between Germ-Free and Conventional BALB/c Mice

Hazebrouck S.a · Przybylski-Nicaise L.a · Ah-Leung S.a · Adel-Patient K.a · Corthier G.b · Wal J.-M.a · Rabot S.b

Author affiliations

aINRA, UR 496, Immuno-Allergie Alimentaire, IBiTecS-SPI, CEA de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, and bINRA, UR 910, Ecologie et Physiologie du Système Digestif, Jouy-en-Josas, France

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Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2009;148:65–72

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: June 25, 2007
Accepted: April 02, 2008
Published online: August 21, 2008
Issue release date: December 2008

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1018-2438 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0097 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/IAA

Abstract

Background: The ‘hygiene hypothesis’ suggests that high hygienic standards met in western countries lead to a lack of microbial exposure, thus promoting the development of atopy by preventing the proper maturation of the immune system. Germ-free animals are deprived of the immune stimulation that occurs during postnatal gut colonization by commensal bacteria. Germ-free mice could thereby provide an attractive model for studying the impact of gut microbiota on the development of Th2-mediated disorders such as allergy. Methods: Germ-free and conventional BALB/c mice were sensitized to β-lactoglobulin (BLG), a major cow’s milk allergen, by means of intraperitoneal injections in the presence of incomplete Freund’s adjuvant. Time courses of serum and fecal BLG-specific antibody responses were monitored and cytokine production was assayed in BLG-reactivated splenocytes. Results: Serum BLG-specific IgG1 and IgE concentrations were significantly higher in germ-free mice during the primary immune response and IgE production persisted longer in germ-free mice. Furthermore, secretion of BLG-specific IgA was evidenced only in feces from germ-free mice while, in contrast, fecal IgG1 concentrations were at least 3-fold higher in conventional mice than in germ-free mice. Production of IL-5, IL-10 and IFN-γ was 3-fold enhanced in BLG-reactivated splenocytes from germ-free mice. Conclusion: The absence of gut microbiota significantly affects the BLG-specific immune response in BALB/c mice, thus suggesting that this model might be of interest for further studies exploring the influence of gut colonization by different bacterial strains on the development of an allergic-type sensitization.

© 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: June 25, 2007
Accepted: April 02, 2008
Published online: August 21, 2008
Issue release date: December 2008

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1018-2438 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0097 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/IAA


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