Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

The karyotype of the Iberian imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) analyzed by classical and DNA replication banding

Padilla J.A. · Martinez-Trancón M. · Rabasco A. · Fernández-García J.L.

Author affiliations

Genética y Mejora Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Extremadura. Cáceres (Spain)

Related Articles for ""

Cytogenet Cell Genet 84:61–66 (1999)

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information










I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information










I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: May 07, 1999
Issue release date: 1999

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

Abstract.

We report here for the first time the karyotype of the Iberian imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti). All eagles examined had a diploid number of 82 chromosomes and a greater number of microchromosomes (12 pairs) than has been found in all other species of the Accipitridae family. This karyotypic evidence corroborates the recent separation of A. adalberti from A. heliaca on the basis of molecular data. RB-FPG banding induced a specific banding pattern that allowed us to identify homologous chromosome pairs and revealed features about late and early replicating regions. Several chromosome banding techniques (C-, CMA3-, and restriction endonuclease banding and silver staining) were used to characterize the karyotype more accurately. Two GC-rich, late-replicating heterochromatin regions were found in the W chromosome. These regions are AluI resistant and can be used for sex determination in this species. All microchromosomes were heterochromatic, GC rich, and late replicating. Silver staining revealed active nucleolus organizing regions on a pair of microchromosomes that were entirely heterochromatic and stained intensely after CMA3-banding. Different chromosome rearrangements are discussed in order to establish the phylogenetic relationship between A. adalberti and its most closely related species, A. heliaca.


References

  1. Belterman RHR, De Boer LEM: A karyological study of 55 species of birds, including karyotypes of 39 species new in cytology. Genetica 65:39–82 (1984).
  2. Belterman RHR, De Boer LEM: A miscellaneous collection of bird karyotypes Genetica 83:17–29 (1990).
  3. Biederman BM, Florence D, Lin CC: Cytogenetic analysis of great horned owls (Bubo virginianus). Cytogenet Cell Genet 28:79–86 (1980).
  4. Bernardi G: The isochore organization of the human genome. A Rev Genet 23:637–661 (1989).
  5. Bernardi G: The vertebrate genome: isochores and chromosomal bands, in Sumner AT, Chandley AC (eds): Chromosomes Today, Vol 11, pp 49–60 (Chapman & Hall, London 1993).
  6. Bhunya SP, Mohanty MK: Localization of constitutive heterochromatin (C- band) and nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) in the somatic chromosomes of a pelecaniform bird, Phalacrocorax niger (Vieillot). Chrom Inform Serv 39:17–19. (1985).
  7. Bhunya SP, Mohanty MK: Distribution of constitutive heterochromatin in the collared Scops owl. J Hered 78:204–205 (1987).
    External Resources
  8. Cramp S, Simmons KEL (eds): Handbook of the Birds of Europe: The Middle East and North Africa, Vol 2 (Oxford University Press, London 1980).
  9. Collar NJ, Andrew P: The ICBP World Checklist of Threatened Birds. ICBP Tech Publ No 8 (International Council of Bird Preservation, Cambridge 1988).
  10. De Boer LEM: The somatic chromosome complements of 16 species of Falconiformes (Aves) and the karyological relationship of the order. Genetica 46:77–113 (1976).
  11. De Boer LEM: New developments in vertebrate cytotaxonomy. VIII. A current list of references of avian karyology. Genetica 65:3–37 (1984).
  12. De Boer LEM, Sinoo RP: A karyological study of Accipitridae (Aves: Falconiformes), with karyotypic descriptions of 16 species new to cytology. Genetica 65:89–107 (1984).
  13. De Lucca EJ: Constitutive heterochromatin and the structural complexity of chromosomes in Columbiformes and Psittaciformes (Aves). Caryologia 36:373– 384 (1983).
  14. De Lucca EJ: Karyotype and nucleolus organizing regions in somatic chromosomes of the white-tailed hawk Buteo albicaudatus (Falconiformes: Aves) Cytobios 42:7–13 (1985).
  15. Fillon V, Seguela A: Le sexage des oiseaux par l’analyse chromosomique. Rev méd vét 146:53–58 (1995).
  16. Hidas A: Cytogenetic studies on an interspecific hybrid goose breed. Proceedings of the 8th North American Colloquium on Domestic Animal Cytogenetics and Gene Mapping, Guelph, Canada, pp 153–155 (1993).
  17. Hoffmann R, Faust R, Weinand U, Hoffman-Fezer G: Chromosomenuntersuchungen an fünf Spezien der Ordnung Falconiformes Zool Gart NF Jena 46:99–107 (1976).
  18. Howell WM, Black DA: Controlled silver-staining resistance of nucleolus organizer regions with a protective colloidal developer: a 1-step method. Experientia 31:260–262 (1980).
  19. Kunze B, Weichenhan D, Virks P, Traut W, Winking H: Copy numbers of a clustered long-range repeat determine C-band staining. Cytogenet Cell Genet 73:86–91 (1996).
    External Resources
  20. Mayr B, Lambrou M, Kalat M, Schleger W, Bigelbach A: Characterization of heterochromatin by sequential counterstain-enhanced fluorescence in three domestic bird species: Meleagris gallopavo, Columba livia domestica and Anser anser L. J Hered 81:468–475 (1990).
  21. McQueen HA, Siriaco G, Bird AP: Chicken microchromosomes are hyperacetyled, early replicating, and gene rich. Genome Res 8:621–630 (1998).
  22. Mezzanotte R, Ferrucci L, Vanni R, Bianchi U: Selective digestion of human metaphase chromosomes by AluI restriction endonuclease. J Histochem Cytochem 31:553–556 (1983).
  23. Nishida-Umehara C, Yoshida MC: The karyotype of nine golden eagles, Aquila chrysaetos. Chrom Inform Serv 56:22–24 (1994).
  24. Rodionov AV: Micro vs. macro: structural-functional organization of avian micro- and macrochromosomes. Genetika 32:597–608 (1996).
  25. Rønne M: Chromosome preparation and high resolution R- and G-banding techniques, in Halnan CRE (ed): Cytogenetics of Animals, pp 11–40 (Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaus International, UK 1989).
  26. Schmid M, Enderle E, Schindler D, Schempp W: Chromosome banding and DNA replication patterns in bird karyotypes. Cytogenet Cell Genet 52:139–146 (1989).
  27. Schweizer D: Simultaneous fluorescent staining of R-bands and specific heterochromatic regions (DA, DAPI-bands) in human chromosomes. Cytogenet Cell Genet 27:190–193 (1980).
  28. Seibold I: Untersuchungen zur molekularen Phylogenie der Greifvögel anhand von DNA-Sequenzen des mitochondriellen Cytochrom b-Gens. PhD Dissertation, University of Heidelberg (1994).
  29. Seibold I, Helbig AJ, Meyburg BU, Negro JJ, Wink M: Genetic differentiation and molecular phylogeny of European Aquila eagles according to cytochrome b nucleotide sequences, in Meyburg BU, Chancellor RD (eds): Eagle Studies (World Working Group on Birds of Prey, Berlin 1996).
  30. Sumner AT: A simple technique for demonstrating centromeric heterochromatin. Expl Cell Res 75:304–306 (1972).
  31. Takagi N, Sasaki M: A phylogenetic study of bird karyotypes. Chromosoma 46:91–120 (1974).
  32. Yadav JS, Arora RB, Yadav AS: Karyotypes of two species of Indian birds and localization of nucleolus organizer regions. Cytobios 82:159–169 (1995).
  33. Zacharias H: Emil Heitz (1892–1965): chloroplast, heterochromatin and polytene chromosomes. Genetics 141:7–11 (1995).

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: May 07, 1999
Issue release date: 1999

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.