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Original Research Article

Comprehension of Emotions: Comparison between Alzheimer Type and Vascular Type Dementias

Shimokawa A.a · Yatomi N.a · Anamizu S.b · Ashikari I.c · Kohno M.d · Maki Y.d · Torii S.e · Isono H.e · Sugai Y.e · Koyama N.f · Matsuno Y.g

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Psychiatry, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, bJiundo Naika Hospital, cDepartment of Neuropsychiatry, School of Medicine, Keio University, dTsukuba Neurological Institute, Tsukuba Memorial Hospital, eYokufuukai Geriatric Hospital, fShinmatsudo Center Hospital, gTokyo Metropolitan Tama Geriatric Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

Related Articles for ""

Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 2000;11:268–274

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Published online: August 09, 2000
Issue release date: September – October

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DEM

Abstract

This study investigated the ability of recognizing emotion in dementia. Twenty-five patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT), 25 patients with vascular dementia (VD), and 12 normal control subjects were evaluated as to general cognition, visuoperception and emotion recognition. The score on the emotion recognition task significantly correlated with that of the Mini-Mental State Examination for VD patients while this was not the case for DAT patients. Moreover, VD patients performed significantly worse than DAT patients on the emotion recognition task in spite of the fact that there was no difference in the general cognitive and visuoperceptual abilities between them. The result of this study coupled with the past studies led to the hypothesis that the relationship between intellectual deficits and the deterioration in recognizing emotions differs according to type of dementia. Caregivers in nursing homes and hospitals need to take into account their patients’ intellectual deficits but also their deteriorating ability of identifying emotions.

© 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel


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    External Resources

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Published online: August 09, 2000
Issue release date: September – October

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DEM


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Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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