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Sex Hormones and Modulation of Immunity against Leishmaniasis

Snider H.a, b · Lezama-Davila C.a · Alexander J.c · Satoskar A.R.a

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Microbiology, bDepartment of Oral Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA; cStrathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK

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Neuroimmunomodulation 2009;16:106–113

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: February 11, 2009
Issue release date: February 2009

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1021-7401 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0216 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NIM

Abstract

Sex-associated hormones such as estradiol, testosterone and progesterone have all been shown to modulate immune responses, which can result in differential disease outcomes between males and females, as well as between pregnant and nonpregnant females. Most parasitic diseases, including leishmaniasis, usually result in more severe disease in males compared with females. This review highlights our current knowledge concerning the role of sex hormones in modulating leishmaniasis in both clinical settings and experimental disease models.

© 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: February 11, 2009
Issue release date: February 2009

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1021-7401 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0216 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NIM


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