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Short Communication

High Prevalence of Seborrhoeic Dermatitis on the Face and Scalp in Mountain Guides

Moehrle M.a · Dennenmoser B.a · Schlagenhauff B.b · Thomma S.a · Garbe C.a

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Dermatology, University of Tübingen, Germany; bAmbulatorium für Dermatologie und Lasermedizin, Swissana Clinic, Meggen, Switzerland

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Dermatology 2000;201:146–147

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Short Communication

Published online: September 29, 2000
Issue release date: 2000

Number of Print Pages: 2
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1018-8665 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9832 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DRM

Abstract

Background: High incidence rates of seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD) have been reported in HIV-infected individuals, indicating immunosuppression to be involved in the pathogenesis. Objective: To establish the prevalence of SD in mountain guides who have a high occupational exposure to solar UV radiation. Patients and Methods: In November 1999, 283 mountain guides were physically examined on the face and scalp for symptoms of SD in Austria (n = 75), Switzerland (n = 123) and Germany (n = 85); they were 21.3–93.1 years of age (median age 41.4 years). Results: Forty-six of 283 (16.3%) mountain guides when examined clinically were found to have SD. The median age of mountain guides with SD was 41.2 years. There were similar incidence rates in all three countries. Conclusion: SD affects mountain guides in a clearly higher percentage as the general population. We suggest UV-induced immunosuppression due to occupational sun exposure as a pathogenetic factor.

© 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Short Communication

Published online: September 29, 2000
Issue release date: 2000

Number of Print Pages: 2
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1018-8665 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9832 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DRM


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