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Original Paper

Association between Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Body Mass Index, Proportion of Body Fat and Body Fat Distribution in Mexican Adolescents

Denova-Gutiérrez E.a · Jiménez-Aguilar A.c · Halley-Castillo E.b · Huitrón-Bravo G.a · Talavera J.O.a · Pineda-Pérez D.d, e · Díaz-Montiel J.C.d · Salmerón J.d

Author affiliations

aCentro de Investigación en Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, and bCentro Médico Adolfo López Mateos, Toluca, cCentro de Investigación en Nutrición y Salud, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, and dUnidad de Salud e Investigación Epidemiológica, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Cuernavaca, and eSecretaria de Salud, México, México

Related Articles for ""

Ann Nutr Metab 2008;53:245–251

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: May 16, 2008
Accepted: October 31, 2008
Published online: January 09, 2009
Issue release date: February 2009

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0250-6807 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9697 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/ANM

Abstract

Background/Aims: It was the aim of this study to evaluate the relationships between sweetened beverage (SB) consumption and the following indicators of overweight/fatness among Mexican adolescents: body mass index, body composition and body fat distribution. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from adolescents participating in the baseline assessment of the Health Workers Cohort Study. Information on sociodemographic conditions, sexual maturation, dietary patterns and physical activity was collected via self-administered questionnaires. SB consumption was evaluated through a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric measures were assessed with standardized procedures. The associations of interest were evaluated by means of multivariate regression and logistic regression models. Results: A total of 1,055 adolescents, 10–19 years old (mean age 14.5 ± 2.5 years), were evaluated. The overweight/obesity prevalence was 31.6% among girls and 31.9% among boys. We found that for each additional SB serving consumed daily, the subject’s body mass index increased by on average 0.33 (p < 0.001). Subjects consuming 3 daily servings of SB face a 2.1 times greater risk of proportionally excess body fat than those who consume less than 1 SB a day. Conclusions: Our data support the hypothesis that the consumption of SB increases the risk of overweight and/or obesity and encourages excess body fat and central obesity in Mexican adolescents.

© 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: May 16, 2008
Accepted: October 31, 2008
Published online: January 09, 2009
Issue release date: February 2009

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0250-6807 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9697 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/ANM


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