Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Original Paper

Depressed Mood after Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The FAST Trial

Christensen M.C.a · Mayer S.A.b · Ferran J.-M.a · Kissela B.c

Author affiliations

aGlobal Development, Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark; bDepartments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Columbia University, New York, N.Y., and cDepartment of Neurology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

Related Articles for ""

Cerebrovasc Dis 2009;27:353–360

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: September 22, 2008
Accepted: November 25, 2008
Published online: February 14, 2009
Issue release date: April 2009

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1015-9770 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9786 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CED

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Depression is a frequent and important complication of stroke. Few data exist on the prevalence of depression/depressed mood after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and the relationship between depression/depressed mood and the quality of life (QoL) more generally experienced by survivors of ICH. Methods: Factor Seven for Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke (FAST) was a randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted between May 2005 and February 2007 at 122 sites in 22 countries. All patients were evaluated at day 90 after ICH onset for depressed mood and QoL with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and the EuroQoL, respectively. Multivariate stepwise logistic regression was used to develop a predictive model for depressed mood at day 90. Relationships between HDRS and EuroQoL scores at day 90 were evaluated with Spearman correlation coefficients. Results: 657 patients were alive at 3 months after ICH onset; 596 (91%) completed the HDRS. Twenty percent reported an HDRS score >10, indicating at least a minor degree of depressed mood; 6% endorsed symptoms of severely depressed mood. Significant predictors of depressed mood included comorbidities (p = 0.0022), moderate to severe neurological impairment according to the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at day 15 (p = 0.0097), physical disability as measured by the Barthel Index (BI) at day 15 (p = 0.0486), and female gender (p = 0.04), but not hemorrhage severity or a history of depression. Irrespective of the presence of post-ICH disability and impairment, the severity of depressed mood at day 90 was significantly correlated with poor QoL. Conclusion: Depressed mood affects approximately 20% of ICH survivors and adversely affects QoL. Physicians should be vigilant to ensure that chronically ill and severely impaired survivors of ICH are adequately monitored and treated for depression after ICH.

© 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel


References

  1. Herrmann N, Black SE, Lawrence J, Szekely C, Szalai JP: The Sunnybrook Stroke Study: a prospective study of depressive symptoms and functional outcome. Stroke 1998;29:618–624.
  2. Hosking SG, Marsh NV, Friedman PJ: Poststroke depression: prevalence, course, and associated factors. Neuropsychol Rev 1996;6:107–133.
  3. Hackett ML, Yapa C, Parag V, Anderson CS: Frequency of depression after stroke: a systematic review of observational studies. Stroke 2005;36:1330–1340.
  4. Hackett ML, Anderson CS: Predictors of depression after stroke: a systematic review of observational studies. Stroke 2005;36:2296–2301.
  5. Mayer S, Brun NC, Begtrup K, Broderick J, Davis S, Diringer M, Skolnick BE, Steiner T: Efficacy and safety of recombinant activated factor VII for acute intracerebral hemorrhage. N Engl J Med 2008;358:2127–2137.
  6. Aben I, Verhey F, Lousberg R, Lodder J, Honig A: Validity of the Beck Depression Inventory, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, SCL-90, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale as screening instruments for depression in stroke patients. Psychosomatics 2002;43:386–393.
  7. Dorman PJ, Waddell F, Slattery J, Dennis M, Sandercock P: Is the EuroQol a valid measure of health-related quality of life after stroke? Stroke 1997;28:1876–1882.
  8. Brooks R, Rabin R, de Charro F (eds): The Measurement and Valuation of Health Status Using EQ-5D: A European Perspective: Evidence from the EuroHRQL BIO MED Research Programme. Dordrecht, Kluwer, 2003.
  9. Shaw JW, Johnson JA, Coons SJ: US valuation of the EQ-5D health states: development and testing of the D2 valuation model. Med Care 2005;43:203–220.
  10. Johnson JA, Coons SJ: Comparison of the EQ-5D and SF-12 in an adult US sample. Qual Life Res 1998;7:155–166.
  11. Luo N, Johnson JA, Shaw JW, Feeny D, Coons SJ: Self-reported health status of the general adult US population as assessed by the EQ-5D and Health Utilities Index. Med Care 2005;43:1078–1086.
  12. Regier DA, Narrow WE, Rae DS, Manderscheid RW, Locke BZ, Goodwin FK: The de facto mental and addictive disorders service system. Epidemiologic catchment area prospective 1-year prevalence rates of disorders and services. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1993;50:85–94.
  13. Weissman MM, Bland RC, Canino GJ, Faravelli C, Greenwald S, Hwu HG, Joyce PR, Karam EG, Lee CK, Lellouch J, Lepine JP, Newman SC, Rubio-Stipec M, Wells JE, Wickramaratne PJ, Wittchen H, Yeh EK: Cross-national epidemiology of major depression and bipolar disorder. JAMA 1996;276:193–199.
  14. Alexopoulos GS, Buckwalter K, Olin J, Martinez R, Wainscott C, Krishnan KRR: Comorbidity of late life depression: an opportunity for research on mechanism and treat- ment. Biol Psychiatry 2002;52:543–558.
  15. Wilson I, Duszynski K, Mant A: A 5-year follow-up of general practice patients experiencing depression. Fam Pract 2003;20:685–689.
  16. Carota A, Berney A, Aybek S, Iaria G, Staub F, Ghika-Schmid F, Annable L, Guex P, Bogousslavsky J: A prospective study of predictors of poststroke depression. Neurology 2005;64:1888–1892.
  17. Hackett ML, Anderson GC: Frequency, management and predictors of abnormal mood after stroke. The Auckland Regional Community Stroke (ARCOS) study, 2002 to 2003. Stroke 2006;37:2123–2128.
  18. Eriksson M, Asplund K, Glader EL, Norrving B, Stegmayr B, Terént A, Asberg KH, Wester PO; Riks-Stroke Collaboration. Self-reported depression and use of antidepressants after stroke: a national survey. Stroke 2004;35:936–941.
  19. Paul SL, Dewey HM, Sturm JW, Macdonell RA, Thrift AG: Prevalence of depression and use of antidepressant medication at 5-years poststroke in the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study. Stroke 2006;37:2854–2855.
  20. Anderson CS, Hackett ML, House AO: Interventions for preventing depression after stroke. The Cochrane Library, Issue 3. Chichester, Wiley, 2006.
  21. Gabaldón L, Fuentes B, Frank-García A, Díez-Tejedor E: Poststroke depression: importance of its detection and treatment. Cerebrovasc Dis 2007;24(suppl 1):181–188.
    External Resources
  22. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-IV. Washington, American Psychiatric Association, 1994.
  23. Åström M, Adofsson R, Asplund K: Major depression in stroke patients: a 3-year longitudinal study. Stroke 1993;24:976–982.
    External Resources
  24. Sneeuw KC, Aaronson NK, de Haan RJ, Limburg M: Assessing quality of life after stroke. The value and limitations of proxy ratings. Stroke 1997;28:1541–1549.
  25. Duncan PW, Lai SM, Tyler D, Perera S, Reker DM, Studenski S: Evaluation of proxy responses to the Stroke Impact Scale. Stroke 2002;33:2593–2599.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: September 22, 2008
Accepted: November 25, 2008
Published online: February 14, 2009
Issue release date: April 2009

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1015-9770 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9786 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CED


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.