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Technical Report

A Novel Food Processing Technique by a Wild Mountain Gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei)

Sawyer S.C. · Robbins M.M.

Author affiliations

Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany

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Folia Primatol 2009;80:83–88

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Technical Report

Received: June 04, 2008
Accepted: January 20, 2009
Published online: May 07, 2009
Issue release date: July 2009

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR

Abstract

Innovation, the invention of new behavior, has been observed in wild primates only infrequently. The processing of thistle (Cardus nyassanus) has previously been described as being one of the most complex food processing techniques used by mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei). We report a case of innovation in thistle leaf processing by a subadult female mountain gorilla in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda. This technique involved rolling the thistle leaves into a ball between her palms prior to putting them in her mouth, as opposed to the standard method of folding leaves. All other weaned individuals (n = 13) were observed to use the standard method to process thistle leaves as described in Byrne et al. While the subadult female emigrated out of the research group 6 months after she had first been observed using the innovative technique, preventing observations of possible transmission within the group, it adds to the debate of whether food processing techniques used by gorillas are socially learned or not.

© 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel


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    External Resources
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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Technical Report

Received: June 04, 2008
Accepted: January 20, 2009
Published online: May 07, 2009
Issue release date: July 2009

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR


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