Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

The Evolving Role of T Cells in Allergic Disease

Cloned Th Cells Confer Eosinophilic Inflammation and Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness

Kaminuma O.a, b · Mori A.a, c · Ogawa K.a, b · Nakata A.b · Kikkawa H.b · Ikezawa K.b · Okudaira H.a

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Medicine and Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo; bDiscovery Research Laboratory, Tanabe Seiyaku Co., Ltd., Saitama: cResearch Center for Allergy and Rheumatology, National Sagamihara Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan

Related Articles for ""

Int Arch Allergy Immunol 1999;118:136–139

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information










I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information










I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of The Evolving Role of T Cells in Allergic Disease

Published online: April 23, 1999
Issue release date: February – April

Number of Print Pages: 4
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1018-2438 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0097 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/IAA

Abstract

Background: The essential role of Th cells and T cell cytokines in eosinophilic inflammation has been established. Methods: To determine whether Th cells are sufficient for the development of airway eosinophilic inflammation, ovalbumin–reactive murine Th clones were established and infused into unprimed mice. Results: Eosinophilic infiltration into the lung was induced upon antigen inhalation in parallel with the rise in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) eosinophil peroxidase activity. Neither IgG, IgA, nor IgE antibodies were present in this model. Pathological examination showed swelling and desquamation of epithelial cells, mucous plugs, and goblet cell hyperplasia, all of which well resemble human asthma. Fluorescent probe labeled Th clones migrated into the lung prior to the eosinophil accumulation. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) was clearly induced upon antigen inhalation. Anti–IL–5 monoclonal antibody abrogated the responses. Dexamethasone and cyclosporin A suppressed cytokine production by Th cells both in vitro and in vivo, BALF eosinophilia, and BHR. The number of eosinophils recovered in the BALF correlated with the intensity of BHR. Conclusion: The results clearly indicated that monoclonal Th cells are sufficient for the development of both airway eosinophilia and BHR. Agents capable of downregulating IL–5 production seem promising for the treatment of bronchial asthma.


References

  1. Robinson D, Hamid Q, Bentley A, Ying S, Kay AB, Durham SR: Activation of CD4+ T cells, increased TH2–type cytokine mRNA expression, and eosinophil recruitment in bronchoalveolar lavage after allergen inhalation challenge in patients with atopic asthma. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1993;92:313–324.
  2. Nakajima H, Iwamoto I, Tomoe S, Matsumura R, Tomioka H, Takatsu K, Yoshida S: CD4+ T–lymphocytes and interleukin–5 mediate antigen–induced eosinophil infiltration into the mouse trachea. Am Rev Respir Dis 1992;146: 374–377.
  3. Walker C, Bode E, Boer L, Hansel TT, Blaser K, Virchow JC Jr: Allergic and nonallergic asthmatics have distinct patterns of T–cell activation and cytokine production in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage. Am Rev Respir Dis 1992;146:109–115.
  4. Krishnaswamy G, Liu MC, Su SN, Kumai M, Xiao HQ, Marsh DG, Huang SK: Analysis of cytokine transcripts in the bronchoalveolar lavage cells of patients with asthma. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 1993;9:279–286.
  5. Mori A, Kaminuma O, Suko M, Mikami T, Nishizaki Y, Ohmura T, Hoshino A, Asakura Y, Miyazawa K, Ando T, Okumura Y, Yamamoto K, Okudaira H: Cellular and molecular mechanisms of IL–5 synthesis in atopic diseases: A study with allergen–specific human helper T cells. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1997;100(suppl):56–64.
  6. Fukuda T, Asakawa S, Motojima S, Makino S: Cyclosporin A reduces T lymphocyte activity and improves airway hyperresponsiveness in corticosteroid–dependent chronic severe asthma. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 1995;75: 65–72.
    External Resources
  7. Nagai H, Yamaguchi S, Tanaka H, Inagaki N: Effect of some immunosuppressors on allergic bronchial inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 1995; 108:189–195.
  8. Mori A, Suko M, Nishizaki Y, Kaminuma O, Kobayashi S, Matsuzaki G, Yamamoto K, Ito K, Tsuruoka N, Okudaira H: IL–5 production by CD4+ T cells of asthmatic patients is suppressed by glucocorticoids and the immunosuppressants FK506 and cyclosporin A. Int Immunol 1995;7:449–457.
  9. Druilhe A, Cai Z, Haile S, Chouaib S, Pretolani M: Fas–mediated apoptosis in cultured human eosinophils. Blood 1996;87:2822–2830.
  10. Burke–Gaffney A, Hellewell PG: Regulation of ICAM–1 by dexamethasone in a human vascular endothelial cell line, EAhy926. Am J Physiol 1996;270:C552–C561.
    External Resources
  11. Daeron M, Sterk AR, Hirata F, Ishizaka T: Biochemical analysis of glucocorticosteroid–induced inhibition of IgE–mediated histamine release from mouse mast cells. J Immunol 1982; 129:1212–1218.
    External Resources
  12. Marone G, De Paulis A, Casolaro V, Ciccarelli A, Spadaro G, Cirillo R: In vitro and in vivo characterization of the anti–inflammatory effects of cyclosporin A. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 1992;99:279–283.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of The Evolving Role of T Cells in Allergic Disease

Published online: April 23, 1999
Issue release date: February – April

Number of Print Pages: 4
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1018-2438 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0097 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/IAA


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.