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Water for Haemodialysis and Related Therapies: Recent Standards and Emerging Issues

Hoenich N.A.a · Levin R.b · Ronco C.c

Author affiliations

aICM Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK; bRenal Research Institute, New York, N.Y., USA; cSan Bortolo Hospital, Vicenza, Italy

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Blood Purif 2010;29:81–85

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: January 08, 2010
Issue release date: January 2010

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0253-5068 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9735 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/BPU

Abstract

Dialysis is a well-established and widely used procedure. For a number of years, the focus has been on ensuring that water used in the preparation of dialysis fluid meets the required chemical and microbiological quality and complies with national or international standards which have recently been updated. Continued vigilance is required, in particular when new chemicals such as silver-stabilized hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide are used to prevent growth of Legionella bacteria in hospital water systems, since residues are harmful to patients receiving dialysis. To achieve the required quality, large volumes of water are processed, and a substantial portion is sent to waste via the municipal sewer systems with little attempt to reuse such water on site. In view of concern about global warming and climate change, there is a need to adopt a more environmentally conscious attitude requiring dialysis providers to focus on this aspect of water usage.

© 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: January 08, 2010
Issue release date: January 2010

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0253-5068 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9735 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/BPU


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Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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