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Short Communication

A Vestigial X Open Reading Frame in Duck Hepatitis B Virus

Lin B. · Anderson D.A.

Author affiliations

Macfarlane Burnet Centre for Medical Research, Fairfield, Melbourne, Australia

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Intervirology 2000;43:185–190

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Short Communication

Published online: October 23, 2000
Issue release date: October 2000

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0300-5526 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0100 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/INT

Abstract

Duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) appears to lack a homologue of the X protein found in mammalian hepadnaviruses. By replacing stop codons in the corresponding region of the DHBV genome, a hypothetical protein which closely matches the hydrophilicity profile of X proteins can be predicted, despite limited sequence homology. We conclude that a full-length X protein was once a common feature of the hepadnaviruses, conserved in structure but not sequence.

© 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Short Communication

Published online: October 23, 2000
Issue release date: October 2000

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0300-5526 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0100 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/INT


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