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Original Paper

Free Access

Differential Mucosal IL-17 Expression in Two Gliadin-Induced Disorders: Gluten Sensitivity and the Autoimmune Enteropathy Celiac Disease

Sapone A.a, b · Lammers K.M.b · Mazzarella G.d · Mikhailenko I.c · Cartenì M.a · Casolaro V.b, e · Fasano A.b

Author affiliations

aSezione Biotecnologia e Biologia Molecolare, Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli, Naples, Italy; bMucosal Biology Research Center and cCenter for Vascular and Inflammatory Diseases, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md., USA; dIstituto Scienze Alimentari, CNR, Avellino, Italy; eDivision of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md., USA

Corresponding Author

Correspondence to: Prof. Alessio Fasano

University of Maryland School of Medicine

Mucosal Biology Research Center, Health Science Facility II

Rm. S345, 20 Penn St., Baltimore, MD 21201 (USA)

Tel. +1 410 706 5501, Fax +1 410 706 5508, E-Mail afasano@mbrc.umaryland.edu

Related Articles for ""

Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010;152:75–80

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Abstract

Background: The immune-mediated enteropathy, celiac disease (CD), and gluten sensitivity (GS) are two distinct clinical conditions that are both triggered by the ingestion of wheat gliadin. CD, but not GS, is associated with and possibly mediated by an autoimmune process. Recent studies show that gliadin may induce the activation of IL-17-producing T cells and that IL-17 expression in the CD mucosa correlates with gluten intake. Methods: The small-intestinal mucosa of patients with CD and GS and dyspeptic controls was analyzed for expression of IL-17A mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR. The number of CD3+ and TCR-γδ lymphocytes and the proportion of CD3+ cells coexpressing the Th17 marker CCR6 were examined by in situ small-intestinal immunohistochemistry. Results: Mucosal expression of IL-17A was significantly increased in CD but not in GS patients, compared to controls. This difference was due to enhanced IL-17A levels in >50% of CD patients, with the remainder expressing levels similar to GS patients or controls, and was paralleled by a trend toward increased proportions of CD3+CCR6+ cells in intestinal mucosal specimens from these subjects. Conclusion: We conclude that GS, albeit gluten-induced, is different from CD not only with respect to the genetic makeup and clinical and functional parameters, but also with respect to the nature of the immune response. Our findings also suggest that two subgroups of CD, IL-17-dependent and IL-17-independent, may be identified based on differential mucosal expression of this cytokine.

© 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: March 09, 2009
Accepted: July 14, 2009
Published online: November 24, 2009
Issue release date: April 2010

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1018-2438 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0097 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/IAA


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