Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Original Paper

Stroke Recurrence Is More Frequent in Blacks and Hispanics

Sheinart K.F.a · Tuhrim S.a · Horowitz D.R.a · Weinberger J.a · Goldman M.b · Godbold J.H.c

Author affiliations

Departments of a Neurology, b Cardiology and c Community Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, N.Y., USA

Related Articles for ""

Neuroepidemiology 1998;17:188–198

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: July 10, 1998
Issue release date: July – August

Number of Print Pages: 11
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0251-5350 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0208 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NED

Abstract

This study was designed to measure recurrent stroke rates and identify their determinants in a mixed ethnic population. A cohort of 299 patients (110 black, 57 Hispanic and 132 white) admitted to a large urban hospital with an acute stroke between November 1, 1991, and July 1, 1993, was followed for a mean of 17.8 months. Demographic and historical data and stroke subtype and severity were recorded at the time of the index stroke. The main outcome measure was stroke recurrence. The unadjusted relative risk of stroke recurrence for blacks, relative to whites, was 2.0 (95% CI: 0.9–4.4) and for Hispanics, relative to whites, it was 2.6 (95% CI: 1.08–6.0). Ethnicity appeared to be associated with recurrence risk only among first-ever strokes: the risk for blacks, relative to whites, was 2.4 (95% CI: 1.02–5.5) and for Hispanics it was 2.9 (95% CI: 1.2–7.4). None of the other putative risk factors for stroke recurrence identified at the time of initial hospitalization were associated with risk of recurrence.


References

  1. NCHBPE: National Conference on High Blood Pressure Education – Report on Proceedings. Bethesda, US Department of Health, Education and Welfare, PHS, NIH, 1973, pp 73–486.
  2. Robins M, Baum HM: Incidence: The national survey of stroke. Stroke 1981;12(suppl 1):45–57.
  3. Meissner I, Whisnant JP, Garraway WM: Hypertension management and stroke recurrence in a community (Rochester, Minnesota, 1950–79). Stroke 1988;19:459–463.
    External Resources
  4. Burn J, Dennis M, Bamford J, Sandercock P, Wade D, Warlow C: Long-term risk of recurrent stroke after a first-ever stroke. Stroke 1994;25:333–337.
  5. Modan B, Wagener DK: Some epidemiological aspects of stroke: Mortality/morbidity trends, age, sex, race, socioeconomic status. Stroke 1992;23:1230–1236.
  6. Kannel WB, Wolf P: Inferences from secular trend analysis of hypertension control. Am J Public Health 1992;82:1593–1595.
  7. Rosenwaike I: Mortality among the Puerto Rican born in New York City. Soc Sci Q 1983;64:375–385.
    External Resources
  8. Gillum RF: Epidemiology of stroke in Hispanic Americans. Stroke 1995;26:1707–1712.
  9. Vital Statistics, New York City 1976–1985.
  10. Foulkes MA, Wolf PA, Price TR, Mohr JP, Hier DB: The Stroke Data Bank: Design, methods and baseline characteristics. Stroke 1988;19:547–554.
  11. Sacco RL, Wolf PA, Kannel WB, McNamara PM: Survival and recurrence following stroke – The Framingham study. Stroke 1982;13:290–295.
  12. Alter M, Sobel E, McCoy RL, Francis ME, Davanipour Z, Shofer F, Levitt LP, Meehan EF: Stroke in the Lehigh Valley: Risk factors for recurrent stroke. Neurology 1987;37:503–507.
  13. Sacco RL, Shi T, Zamanillo MC, Kargman DE: Predictors of mortality and recurrence after hospitalized cerebral infarction in an urban community. Neurology 1994;44:626–634.
  14. Lai SM, Alter M, Friday G, Sobel E: A multifactorial analysis for risk factors of recurrence of ischemic stroke. Stroke 1994;25:958–962.
  15. Hier DB, Foulkes MA, Swiontoniowski M, Sacco RL, Gorelick PB, Mohr JP, Price TR, Wolf PA: Stroke recurrence within 2 years after ischemic infarction. Stroke 1991;22:155–161.
  16. Olsson T, Viitanen M, Asplund K, Eriksson S, Haag E: Prognosis after stroke in diabetic patients: A controlled prospective study. Diabetologia 1990;33:244–249.
  17. Sobel E, Alter M, Davenipour Z, Friday G, McCoy LP, Levitt LP, Isack T: Stroke in the Lehigh Valley: Combined risk factors for recurrent ischemic stroke. Neurology 1989;39:669–672.
  18. Gorelick PB: African-American Antiplatelet Stroke Prevention Study (AAAPS). Stroke 1997;28:234.
  19. Schonewille WJ, Sheinart KF, Tuhrim S, Godbold JH: Silent Cerebral Infarction in First-Ever Stroke in the Minorities, Risk Factors and Stroke Study. Stroke 1997;28:267.
  20. Broderick JP, Phillips SJ, O’Fallon WM, Frye RL, Whisnant JP: Relationship of cardiac disease to stroke occurrence, recurrence and mortality. Stroke 1992;23:1250–1256.
  21. Johnston JH, Beevers DG, Dunn FG, Larkin H, Titterington DM: The importance of good blood pressure control in the prevention of stroke recurrence in hypertensive patients. Postgrad Med 1981;57:690–693.
  22. Beevers DG, Fairman MJ, Hamilton M, Harpur JE: Antihypertensive treatment and the course of established cerebrovascular disease. Lancet 1973;i:1407–1409.
  23. Hypertension-Stroke Cooperative Study Group (HSCSG): Effect of anti-hypertensive treatment on stroke recurrence. JAMA 1974;229:409–418.
  24. Walker WG, Neaton JD, Cutler JA, Neuwirth R, Cohen JD: Renal function change in hypertensive members of the Multiple Risk Intervention Trial: Racial and treatment effects. JAMA 1992;268:3085–3091.
  25. Kusek JW, Agodoa L, Greene T, Jones C, for the MDRD study: Comparison of decline of GFR in blacks vs non-blacks in the MDRD study. J Am Soc Nephrol 1993;4:253a.
  26. Beaglehole R, Tyroler HA, Cassel JC, Deubner DC, Bartel AG, Hames GG: An epidemiological study of left ventricular hypertrophy in the biracial population of Evans County, Georgia. J Chronic Dis 1975;28:549–559.
    External Resources
  27. Hammond IW, Alderman MH, Devereux RB, Lutas EM, Laragh JH: Contrast in cardiac anatomy and function between black and white patients with hypertension. J Natl Med Assoc 1984;76:247–255.
    External Resources
  28. Koren MI, Devereux RB, Casale PN, Savage DD, Laragh JH: Relation of left ventricular mass and geometry to morbidity and mortality in uncomplicated essential hypertension. Ann Intern Med 1991;114:345–352.
  29. Hinderliter AL, Light KC, Willis PW: Racial differences in left ventricular structure in healthy young adults. Am J Cardiol 1992;69:1196–1199.
  30. Verdecchia P, Porcellati C, Schillaci G, Borgioni C, Ciucci A, Battistelli M, Guerrieri M, Gatteschi C, Zampi I, Santucci A, Santucci C, Reboldi G: Ambulatory blood pressure: An independent predictor of prognosis in essential hypertension. Hypertension 1994;24:793–801.
  31. Harshfield GA, Hwang C, Grim CE: Circadian variation of blood pressure during a normal day in normotensive blacks. Circulation 1988;78(suppl II):II-188.
  32. Harshfield GA, Alpert BS, Willey ES, Somes GW, Murphy JK, Dupaul LM: Race and gender influence ambulatory blood pressure patterns of adolescents. Hypertension 1989;14:598–603.
    External Resources
  33. Murphy MB, Nelson KS, Elliot WJ: Racial differences in diurnal blood pressure profile. Am J Hypertens 1988;1(part 2):55A.
  34. Murphy MB, Fumo MT, Gretler DD, Nelson KS, Lang RM: Diurnal blood pressure variation: Differences among disparate ethnic groups. J Hypertens 1991;9(suppl 8):S45–S47.
  35. Francis CK: Hypertension, cardiac disease and compliance in minority patients. Am J Med 1991;91(suppl 1A):29S–36S.
  36. Kerr EA, Siu AL: Follow-up after hospital discharge: Does insurance make a difference? J Health Care Poor Underserved 1993;4:133–142.
  37. Bindman AB, Grumbach K, Osmond D, Komaromy M, Vranizan K, Lurie N, Billings J, Stewart A: Preventable hospitalizations and access to health care. JAMA 1995;274:305–311.
  38. Spitalewitz S, Parnes EL, Porush JG, Ramamurthy G: Effective hypertension control in inner city blacks. NY State J Med 1991;91:189–192.
  39. Tuhrim S, Godbold JH, Goldman ME, Horowitz DR, Weinberger J: The Minorities Risk Factors and Stroke Study (MRFASS): Design, methods and baseline characteristics. Neuroepidemiology 1997;16:224–233.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: July 10, 1998
Issue release date: July – August

Number of Print Pages: 11
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0251-5350 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0208 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NED


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.