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Original Article

Decreased Serum Prolidase Activity and Increased Oxidative Stress in Early Pregnancy Loss

Toy H.a · Camuzcuoglu H.a · Camuzcuoglu A.c · Celik H.b · Aksoy N.b

Author affiliations

Departments of aObstetrics and Gynecology, and bClinical Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Harran University, cDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sanliurfa Maternity Hospital, Sanlıurfa, Turkey

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Gynecol Obstet Invest 2010;69:122–127

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: January 12, 2009
Accepted: October 12, 2009
Published online: December 02, 2009
Issue release date: March 2010

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0378-7346 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-002X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/GOI

Abstract

Aims: To compare the levels of serum prolidase activity and oxidative stress markers including total oxidative status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) and total free sulfhydryl (–SH) in healthy pregnant women without early pregnancy loss (EPL) and women with EPL. Methods: Serum samples were obtained from 45 healthy first-trimester pregnancies and 45 pregnancies complicated with EPL. We have measured serum prolidase activity, TAC, TOS, –SH and LOOH levels spectrophotometrically. Results: Serum prolidase, TAC and –SH levels were significantly lower in the women with EPL than in the women without EPL (p <0.001, p = 0.001, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas TOS and LOOH levels were significantly higher (p < 0.001, p = 0.004, respectively). Prolidase activity was negatively correlated with TOS and LOOH levels (r = –0.299, p = 0.004; r = –0.323, p = 0.002, respectively), while positively correlated with TAC and –SH levels (r = 0.232, p = 0.028, and r = 0.418, p <0.001, respectively) Conclusion: Findings of this study have shown that serum prolidase activity and oxidative stress are significantly associated with the presence of EPL, and the correlation between serum prolidase activity and the markers of oxidative stress was reflected in increased serum TOS and LOOH levels and decreased serum TAC and –SH levels.

© 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: January 12, 2009
Accepted: October 12, 2009
Published online: December 02, 2009
Issue release date: March 2010

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0378-7346 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-002X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/GOI


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