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Review Article

Anti-Fat Prejudice Reduction: A Review of Published Studies

Daníelsdóttir S.a · O'Brien K.S.b · Ciao A.c

Author affiliations

aDivision of Psychiatry, Landspítali-University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; bSchool of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, UK; cDepartment of Psychology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, USA

Corresponding Author

Dr. Kerry S. O’Brien School of Psychological Sciences University of Manchester Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK Tel. +44 161 275 2578 kerrykez@gmail.com

Related Articles for ""

Obes Facts 2010;3:47–58

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Abstract

Prejudice against those who are perceived as ‘fat’ or obese (anti-fat prejudice) is rife, increasing, and associated with negative outcomes for those targeted for such treatment. The present review sought to identify and describe published research on interventions to reduce anti-fat prejudice. A systematic search of relevant databases (e.g. PsychInfo, PubMed, Scopus) found 16 published studies that had sought to reduce anti-fat prejudice. Most notable was the lack of research on interventions for reducing anti-fat prejudice. Methodological problems that limit the interpretability of results were identified in the majority of studies found. Interventions employing more rigorous experimental designs provided at best mixed evidence for effectiveness. Although several studies reported changes in beliefs and knowledge about the causes of obesity, reductions in anti-fat prejudice did not typically accompany these changes. Anti-fat prejudice interventions adopting social norm- and social consensusbased approaches appear encouraging but are scarce. The lack of prejudice reduction following most interventions suggests that psychological mechanisms other than, or additional to, those being manipulated may underpin anti-fat prejudice. New directions for researching anti-fat prejudice are suggested. Given the strength of antipathy displayed toward those who are perceived as ‘fat’ or obese, research in this area is urgently required.

© 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Review Article

Published online: February 11, 2010
Issue release date: March 2010

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1662-4025 (Print)
eISSN: 1662-4033 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/OFA


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