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Importance of Growth for Health and Development

65th Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop, Pediatric Program, Kuala Lumpur, March 2009

Editor(s): Lucas A. (London) 
Makrides M. (Adelaide, S.A.) 
Ziegler E.E. (Iowa City, Iowa) 
Cover

Growth, Obesity and CV Outcomes

Does Early Growth Affect Long-Term Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease?

Singhal A.

Author affiliations

MRC Childhood Nutrition Research Centre, Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK

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Lucas A, Makrides M, Ziegler EE (eds): Importance of Growth for Health and Development. Nestlé Nutr Inst Workshop Ser Pediatr Program, vol 65, pp 55–69, Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel, © 2010

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Growth, Obesity and CV Outcomes

Published online: February 01, 2010
Cover Date: 2010

Number of Print Pages: 15
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-8055-9304-5 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-8055-9305-2 (Online)

Abstract

The concept that early growth and nutrition have long-term biological effects is based on extensive studies in animals dating from the 1930s. More recently, compelling evidence for a long-term influence, or programming effect, of growth has also emerged in humans. Substantial evidence now supports the hypothesis that ‘accelerated’ or too fast infant growth increases the propensity to the major components of the metabolic syndrome (glucose intolerance, obesity, raised blood pressure and dyslipidemia), the clustering of risk factors which predispose to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The association between infant growth and these risk factors is strong, consistent, shows a dose-response effect, and is biologically plausible. Moreover, experimental data from prospective randomized controlled trials strongly support a causal link between infant growth and later cardiovascular risk factors. These observations suggest therefore that the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease could begin from as early as the first few months of life. The present review considers this evidence, the underlying mechanisms involved and its implications for public health.

© 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Growth, Obesity and CV Outcomes

Published online: February 01, 2010
Cover Date: 2010

Number of Print Pages: 15
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-8055-9304-5 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-8055-9305-2 (Online)


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