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Original Research Article

Pittsburgh Compound-B and Alzheimer’s Disease Biomarkers in CSF, Plasma and Urine: An Exploratory Study

Degerman Gunnarsson M.a · Lindau M.a, f · Wall A.c · Blennow K.d · Darreh-Shori T.e · Basu S.b · Nordberg A.e · Larsson A.a · Lannfelt L.a · Basun H.g · Kilander L.a

Author affiliations

Departments of aPublic Health/Geriatrics and bPublic Health/Oxidative Stress and Inflammation, Uppsala University, and cGE Healthcare Uppsala, Imanet PET Center, Uppsala, dSahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, eKarolinska Institutet, Division of Alzheimer Neurobiology, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, fDepartment of Psychology, Stockholm University, and gBioArctic Neuroscience, Stockholm, Sweden

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Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 2010;29:204–212

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Accepted: January 26, 2010
Published online: March 20, 2010
Issue release date: April 2010

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DEM

Abstract

Background: The positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer Pittsburgh Compound-B (PIB) is an in vivo ligand for measuring β-amyloid (Aβ) load. Associations between PET PIB and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ1–42 and apolipoprotein E Ε4 (APOE Ε4) have been observed in several studies, but the relations between PIB uptake and other biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are less investigated. Method: PET PIB, PET 18Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and different AD biomarkers were measured twice in CSF, plasma and urine 12 months apart in 10 patients with a clinical diagnosis of mild to moderate AD. Results: PIB retention was constant over 1 year, inversely related to low CSF Aβ1–42 (p = 0.01) and correlated positively to the numbers of the APOE Ε4 allele (0, 1 or 2) (p = 0.02). There was a relation between mean PIB retention and CSF ApoE protein (r = –0.59, p = 0.07), and plasma cystatin C (r = –0.56, p = 0.09). Conclusion: PIB retention is strongly related to CSF Aβ1–42, and to the numbers of the APOE Ε4 allele.

© 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Accepted: January 26, 2010
Published online: March 20, 2010
Issue release date: April 2010

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DEM


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