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Case Report

Focal Cortical Dysplasia with Glioproliferative Changes Causing Seizures: Report of 3 Cases

Madsen J.R.a · Vallat A.-V.b · Poussaint T.Y.c · Scott R.M.a · De Girolami U.b · Anthony D.C.b

Author affiliations

Departments of a Neurosurgery, b Pathology, and c Radiology, Children’s Hospital, Boston, Mass., USA

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Pediatr Neurosurg 1998;28:261–266

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Case Report

Published online: September 03, 1998
Issue release date: May 1998

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1016-2291 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0305 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/PNE

Abstract

In contrast to neoplasia, lesions of focal cerebral dysplasia are thought to be completed developmental processes of abnormal neuronal migration. We present three children with seizures resulting from brain lesions which pathologically demonstrate regions of both clearcut focal cortical dysplasia and also hypercellularity and monomorphism typical of proliferative lesions such as low grade glial tumor. These cases suggest the existence of a distinct subgroup of patients with prominent glioproliferative changes in association with focal cortical dysplasia, challenging the conventional dichotomy between dysplastic and proliferative categories of brain lesions. Recognition of patients with dual pathology may be of practical as well as theoretical importance.


References

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    External Resources
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  16. Prayson RA, Khajavi K, Comair YG: Cortical architectural abnormalities and MIB1 immunoreactivity in gangliogliomas: A study of 60 patients with intracranial tumors. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 1995;54:513–520.
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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Case Report

Published online: September 03, 1998
Issue release date: May 1998

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1016-2291 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0305 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/PNE


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