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Original Paper

Prenatal Lipopolysaccharide Reduces Social Behavior in Male Offspring

Kirsten T.B. · Taricano M. · Maiorka P.C. · Palermo-Neto J. · Bernardi M.M.

Author affiliations

Neuroimmunomodulation Research Group, Department of Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

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Neuroimmunomodulation 2010;17:240–251

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: April 15, 2009
Accepted: December 08, 2009
Published online: March 05, 2010
Issue release date: March 2010

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1021-7401 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0216 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NIM

Abstract

Objective: This study investigated the relationship between maternal sickness behavior during pregnancy and offspring development and behavior. Methods: Pregnant Wistar rats were administered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 µg/kg, i.p.) on gestation day (GD) 9.5. Dams’ sickness behavior was analyzed, and at birth, offspring number and weight were evaluated. Male offspring was evaluated through physical development, play behavior, adult social interaction, plus maze studies and morphological analysis of the brain. Results: Results, with respect to the control group, showed that: (1) LPS decreased general activity, food intake, and weight gain in dams, but no pyrexia was observed following treatment; (2) LPS reduced litter size, but no alterations in physical development were observed; (3) LPS reduced play behavior parameters in baby rats; (4) LPS decreased adult social interaction; (5) no alterations were observed between groups on plus maze studies; (6) no differences were observed between groups on morphological analyses of the brain. Conclusion: These data reveal that LPS administered on GD 9.5 impaired male offspring’s social behavior in infancy and adulthood. These results may be related to an alteration in motivational states or/and increased anxiety.

© 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: April 15, 2009
Accepted: December 08, 2009
Published online: March 05, 2010
Issue release date: March 2010

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1021-7401 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0216 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NIM


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