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Original Paper

Effect of Black-Currant Extract on Negative Lens-Induced Ocular Growth in Chicks

Iida H.a · Nakamura Y.a · Matsumoto H.a · Takeuchi Y.a · Harano S.b · Ishihara M.b · Katsumi O.c

Author affiliations

aFood and Health R&D Laboratories, Meiji Seika Kaisha Ltd., Sakado, and bAgricultural and Veterinary Research Laboratories, Meiji Seika Kaisha Ltd., Yokohama, and cNishi Kasai Inouye Eye Pediatric Eye Clinic, Tokyo, Japan

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Ophthalmic Res 2010;44:242–250

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: July 01, 2009
Accepted: December 19, 2009
Published online: August 10, 2010
Issue release date: October 2010

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0030-3747 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0259 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/ORE

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the effects of orally administered black-currant (BC) extract on the enlargement of globe component dimensions induced in chicks by wearing negative lenses. Methods: Negative lenses (–8 D) were worn on the right eyes by 8-day-old chicks, and their fellow eyes acted as controls. BC extract and distilled water (vehicle control) were orally administered once a day for 3 days. To confirm the effect of BC anthocyanins (BCAs), they were intravenously administered once a day for 3 days. Dimensions of globe components of right eyes and fellow eyes were measured with an A-scan ultrasound instrument on the third day (day 4) after placement of the negative lenses. Results: Orally administered BC extract significantly inhibited enlargement of vitreous-chamber depth, axial and ocular lengths in a dose-dependent manner when compared to controls. Intravenously administered BCAs also inhibited elongation of vitreous-chamber depth and axial length when compared to controls. Conclusions: This is the first evidence that BC extract and BCAs could inhibit enlargement of globe component dimensions in a negative lens-induced chick myopia model.

© 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: July 01, 2009
Accepted: December 19, 2009
Published online: August 10, 2010
Issue release date: October 2010

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0030-3747 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0259 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/ORE


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