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Experimental Models for Renal Diseases

Pathogenesis and Diagnosis

Editor(s): Herrera G.A. (Tempe, Ariz.) 
Cover

Pathogenesis of Tubular Interstitial Nephritis

Tanaka T.a,b · Nangaku M.b

Author affiliations

aDivision for Health Service Promotion, University of Tokyo, bDivision of Nephrology and Endocrinology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan

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Herrera GA (ed): Experimental Models for Renal Diseases: Pathogenesis and Diagnosis. Contrib Nephrol. Basel, Karger, 2011, vol 169, pp 297–310

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: January 20, 2011
Cover Date: 2011

Number of Print Pages: 14
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 2

ISBN: 978-3-8055-9537-7 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-8055-9538-4 (Online)

Abstract

Injury to the interstitium of the kidney is regarded as a common pathway leading to end-stage renal insufficiency, regardless of etiology. Tubular interstitial nephritis is characterized histologically by inflammatory changes in the tubulointerstitial compartment, such as interstitial edema, leukocyte infiltration, accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins, tubular dilation and atrophy. Acute interstitial nephritis is often associated with use of drugs, such as β- lactam antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and is likely mediated through allergic mechanisms. On the other hand, chronic progressive tubular interstitial nephritis has a much more diverse etiology, ranging from infection and drugs to immunemediated, hematologic, metabolic and hereditary disorders. Experimental studies in the past decade have focused mainly on common factors and mechanisms underlying chronic tubulointerstitial injury, such as activation of peritubular fibroblasts, leukocyte infiltration, release of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors at affected regions, epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tubular epithelium, and apoptosis. The execution of each is mediated by a number of local stimuli, such as filtered albumin, chronic hypoxia and oxidative stress, in addition to cytokines and growth factors. This chapter provides an overview of acute and chronic tubular interstitial nephritis, according to clinical manifestations of the disease. It also provides insight into common pathways underlying chronic tubular interstitial nephritis based on recent advances in translational and experimental research.

© 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: January 20, 2011
Cover Date: 2011

Number of Print Pages: 14
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 2

ISBN: 978-3-8055-9537-7 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-8055-9538-4 (Online)


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