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Short Communication

Functional Capillary Density Decreases after the First Week of Life in Term Neonates

Top A.P.C.a, c · van Dijk M.a · van Velzen J.E.a · Ince C.b · Tibboel D.a

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Pediatric Surgery, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children’s Hospital, and bDepartment of Intensive Care, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; cDepartment of Pediatric Intensive Care, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, UK

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Neonatology 2011;99:73–77

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Short Communication

Received: February 15, 2010
Accepted: June 14, 2010
Published online: August 24, 2010
Issue release date: December 2010

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1661-7800 (Print)
eISSN: 1661-7819 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEO

Abstract

Background: Changes in the microcirculation have been recognized to play a crucial role in many disease processes. In premature neonates, functional capillary density (FCD) decreases during the first months of life. Objectives: The aims of this study were to obtain microcirculatory parameters in term neonates and older children who did not present with compromised respiration or circulation and to determine developmental changes in the microcirculation in young children. Methods: This single-center prospective observational study was performed at a level III university children’s hospital. Subjects eligible for inclusion were children up to the age of 3 years who did not have any respiratory compromise, circulatory compromise or signs of dehydration. The buccal mucosa of 45 children was assessed, using orthogonal polarization spectral imaging. Results: We found a significantly higher FCD in neonates younger than 1 week compared with older children. The median FCD was 8.1 cm/cm2 (range 7.3–9.4) for 0- to 7-day-old neonates (n = 12), 6.9 cm/cm2 (range 4.7–8.7) for 8- to 28-day-olds (n = 10), 7.3 cm/cm2 (range 6.1–8.8) for 1- to 6-month-olds (n = 19) and 6.7 cm/cm2 (range 6.5–9.2) for 3-year-olds (n = 4). After the first week, there was no significant correlation between age and FCD. Conclusion: FCD of the buccal mucosa decreases after the first week of life.

© 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Short Communication

Received: February 15, 2010
Accepted: June 14, 2010
Published online: August 24, 2010
Issue release date: December 2010

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1661-7800 (Print)
eISSN: 1661-7819 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEO


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