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Research Report

Theory of Mind Deficits following Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Mitchell I.J. · Beck S.R. · Boyal A. · Edwards V.R.

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School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK

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Eur Addict Res 2011;17:164–168

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Research Report

Received: November 22, 2010
Accepted: February 01, 2011
Published online: March 29, 2011
Issue release date: April 2011

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1022-6877 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9891 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/EAR

Abstract

Acute alcohol consumption is associated with socially inappropriate behaviour. Such behaviour could in part reflect the potential of alcohol to interfere with social cognition. In this experiment we tested the hypothesis that acute alcohol consumption by regular heavy social drinking young adults would compromise an aspect of social cognition, namely theory of mind (understanding intentions, emotions and beliefs). Participants who had consumed 6–8 units of alcohol showed specific impairments on two theory of mind tests: identification of faux pas and emotion recognition. This result suggests that alcohol consumption could lead to social problems secondary to difficulties in interpreting the behaviour of others due to theory of mind impairments.

© 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Research Report

Received: November 22, 2010
Accepted: February 01, 2011
Published online: March 29, 2011
Issue release date: April 2011

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1022-6877 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9891 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/EAR


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