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Original Paper

In vivo and in vitro Examination of the Tendinous Inscription of the Human Semitendinosus Muscle

Kellis E.a · Galanis N.b · Natsis K.c · Kapetanos G.b

Author affiliations

aLaboratory of Neuromechanics, Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences at Serres, bDepartment of Orthopaedics, Papageorgiou Hospital, and cDepartment of Anatomy, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Serres, Greece

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Cells Tissues Organs 2012;195:365–376

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Accepted: March 21, 2011
Published online: August 09, 2011
Issue release date: March 2012

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 6

ISSN: 1422-6405 (Print)
eISSN: 1422-6421 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CTO

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the tendinous inscription (TI) of the human semitendinosus (ST) muscle using dissection (cadavers) and ultrasound (in vivo). Ultrasonography (US) scans were taken in 18 young males at rest and at maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Further, the ST was dissected and removed from its origins in 10 cadaveric specimens (5 cadavers). The cadaveric long arm of the TI was 6.67 ± 0.64 cm (6.45 ± 1.21 in US) while the shorter arm was 2.39 ± 0.38 cm (1.99 ± 0.75 in US). The angle formed by the two TI arms ranged from 53.19 (US) to 56.05° (cadavers) while more superficial fascicles intersected the inscription at significantly higher angles (range 31.98 ± 6.15 to 34.69 ± 7.71°) compared with deeper fascicles (p < 0.05). Fascicle length did not differ between compartments, but it was significantly smaller in superficial compared with deeper layers (p < 0.05). With the exception of the angle between the TI arm and the deep aponeurosis, all measured angles as well as the length of the long arm of the TI increased significantly from rest to MVC (p < 0.05). The role of the TI probably lies in the local interconnections with the fascicles of either compartment, which upon contraction is such that the ST muscle contracts as one muscle. However, the TI arm morphology changes from rest to MVC, indicating a nonuniform displacement of the TI, mainly between the superficial and deeper layers of the muscle.

© 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Accepted: March 21, 2011
Published online: August 09, 2011
Issue release date: March 2012

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 6

ISSN: 1422-6405 (Print)
eISSN: 1422-6421 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CTO


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