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Original Paper

Impact of Enamel Defects on Early Caries Development in Preschool Children

Carvalho J.C.a, c · Silva E.F.b · Gomes R.R.c · Fonseca J.A.C.c · Mestrinho H.D.c

Author affiliations

aFaculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Catholic University of Louvain, Louvain, Belgium; bDepartment of Statistics and cFaculty of Health Sciences, University of Brasília, Brasília, Brazil

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Caries Res 2011;45:353–360

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: March 07, 2011
Accepted: April 27, 2011
Published online: July 20, 2011
Issue release date: September 2011

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0008-6568 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-976X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CRE

Abstract

Quantitative defects of the enamel are considered risk factors for caries development at the cavitated level. Since caries risk assessment and control should be implemented as early as possible in order to prevent operative treatment, it seemed interesting to investigate the relationship between enamel defects and caries development in the stages of progression that precede cavitation. The impact of enamel defects and selected child-mother indicators on early caries development was investigated in a cohort of Brazilian preschool children. The null hypothesis that developmental defects of the enamel and dental caries are independent and that an association between them occurs by chance was tested. The sample (n = 1,718) was made up of 2- to 5-year-olds. Developmental defects of enamel and caries on buccal surfaces were identified in 48 and 26% of the children, respectively. Bivariate analyses at the surface level showed neither an association between demarcated/diffuse opacity and caries experience (p ≧ 0.64, GLM), nor between the presence of hypoplastic surfaces and non-cavitated lesions (p = 0.29, GLM). The multivariate analyses indicated that in the mouths of individual children, hypoplastic surfaces were more likely to present filled surfaces and non-cavitated/cavitated lesions than non-hypoplastic surfaces (within-child p = 0.03, GEE). However, children having teeth with hypoplastic surfaces were not at higher caries risk than those children who did not present hypoplastic surfaces (between-child p = 0.23, GEE). The null hypothesis could not be accepted for quantitative defects such as hypoplasia, since they had a significant impact on the within-child prevalence of filled surfaces and non-cavitated/cavitated lesions.

© 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: March 07, 2011
Accepted: April 27, 2011
Published online: July 20, 2011
Issue release date: September 2011

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0008-6568 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-976X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CRE


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