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Original Research Article

Prevalence of and Antecedents to Dementia-Related Missing Incidents in the Community

Bowen M.E.a · McKenzie B.a · Steis M.a · Rowe M.a, b

Author affiliations

aVeterans Health Administration, James A. Haley Veterans Hospital, HSR&D/RR&D Center of Excellence, Tampa, Fla., and bCollege of Nursing, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., USA

Related Articles for ""

Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 2011;31:406–412

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Accepted: May 30, 2011
Published online: July 13, 2011
Issue release date: August 2011

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DEM

Abstract

Objective: The primary aim of this study is to examine the prevalence of and antecedents to missing incidents among community-dwelling persons with dementia. Methods: This prospective study used mailed surveys and telephone interviews. Results: The prevalence of having any incident was 0.46/year; the overall prevalence for missing incidents in this study was 0.65/year. Missing incidents had few antecedents and occurred largely when persons with dementia were performing everyday activities that they normally completed without incident. Conclusion: Given that a missing incident is relatively common among persons with dementia, health care professionals should assist caregivers with a missing incident plan early in the disease process. Also, as missing persons are found by persons other than the caregiver and caregivers underutilize identification devices, health care professionals may recommend the use of identification devices to facilitate a safe return.

© 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Accepted: May 30, 2011
Published online: July 13, 2011
Issue release date: August 2011

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DEM


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