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Original Paper

Impact of Cannabis Treatment on the Quality of Life, Weight and Clinical Disease Activity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients: A Pilot Prospective Study

Lahat A. · Lang A. · Ben-Horin S.

Author affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center affiliated to the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel

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Digestion 2012;85:1–8

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: May 19, 2011
Accepted: August 17, 2011
Published online: November 17, 2011
Issue release date: January 2012

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 5

ISSN: 0012-2823 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9867 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DIG

Abstract

Background and Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients suffer from significant morbidity and diminished life quality. The plant cannabis is beneficial in various gastrointestinal diseases, stimulating appetite and causing weight gain. Our aims were to assess whether treatment with inhaled cannabis improves quality of life, disease activity and promotes weight gain in these patients. Methods: Patients with long-standing IBD who were prescribed cannabis treatment were included. Two quality of life questionnaires and disease activity indexes were performed, and patient’s body weight was measured before cannabis initiation and after 3 months’ treatment. Results: Thirteen patients were included. After 3 months’ treatment, patients reported improvement in general health perception (p = 0.001), social functioning (p = 0.0002), ability to work (p = 0.0005), physical pain (p = 0.004) and depression (p = 0.007). A schematic scale of health perception showed an improved score from 4.1 ± 1.43 to 7 ± 1.42 (p = 0.0002). Patients had a weight gain of 4.3 ± 2 kg during treatment (range 2–8; p = 0.0002) and an average rise in BMI of 1.4 ± 0.61 (range 0.8–2.7; p = 0.002). The average Harvey-Bradshaw index was reduced from 11.36 ± 3.17 to 5.72 ± 2.68 (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Three months’ treatment with inhaled cannabis improves quality of life measurements, disease activity index, and causes weight gain and rise in BMI in long-standing IBD patients.

© 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: May 19, 2011
Accepted: August 17, 2011
Published online: November 17, 2011
Issue release date: January 2012

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 5

ISSN: 0012-2823 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9867 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DIG


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Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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