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Original Paper

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Persistence in Macrophages Downregulates Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression and Reduces Adhesion of Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae

Arrevillaga G.a · Gaona J.a · Sánchez C.b · Rosales V.c · Gómez B.a

Author affiliations

aDepartamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, México D.F., bDepartamento de Producción Agrícola, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias, Universidad de Guadalajara, Zapopan, Jal., y cUnidad de Citometría de Flujo, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D.F., México

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Intervirology 2012;55:442–450

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: November 03, 2010
Accepted: November 28, 2011
Published online: May 03, 2012
Issue release date: October 2012

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0300-5526 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0100 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/INT

Abstract

Background: Persistence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been associated with episodes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); furthermore, co-infection of RSV with non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is increasingly recognized as a cause of exacerbations of COPD. Objective: To study whether RSV persistence in a macrophage (Mφ)-like cell line alters NTHi uptake (adhesion and ingestion). Methods: A murine Mφ-like cell line persistently infected with RSV (MφP) was used. The effects of RSV persistence on NTHi uptake by MφP and mock-infected Mφ (MφN) were determined by flow-cytometric assays with NTHi labelled with either ethidium bromide or FITC. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a ligand for NTHi, was determined by measuring mRNA through real-time PCR and protein by Western blot assays. Results: RSV persistence reduced both the capacity of Mφ to take up bacteria and the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA and protein. Furthermore, when ICAM-1 was blocked with anti-ICAM-1 antibody, the adhesion capacity of NTHi was significantly reduced for MφN, whereas for MφP the effect was less evident, implying that ICAM-1 participates in NTHi adhesion to Mφ. Conclusion: RSV persistence in murine Mφ diminishes their capacity to adhere and ingest NTHi through downregulation of ICAM-1 expression at the transcriptional level.

© 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: November 03, 2010
Accepted: November 28, 2011
Published online: May 03, 2012
Issue release date: October 2012

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0300-5526 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0100 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/INT


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