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Original Paper

Liver Proteome Changes Induced by a Short-Term High-Fat Sucrose Diet in Wistar Rats

Bondia-Pons I.a · Boqué N.a · Paternain L.a · Santamaría E.b · Fernández J.b · Campión J.a · Milagro F.a · Corrales F.b · Martínez J.A.a

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aDepartment of Nutrition, Food Science, Physiology and Toxicology, and bCenter for Applied Medical Research, Proteomics Laboratory, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain

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J Nutrigenet Nutrigenomics 2011;4:344–353

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: July 26, 2011
Accepted: December 13, 2011
Published online: February 25, 2012
Issue release date: March 2012

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1661-6499 (Print)
eISSN: 1661-6758 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/JNN

Abstract

Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to gain insight into those proteins that might be involved in the early stages of liver fat accumulation as a consequence of a different fat versus simple sugar dietary intake. Methods: Forty-five male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into four dietary groups: a starch-rich control diet (CD; n = 10), a high-fat diet (n = 12), a high-sucrose diet (n = 11), and a high-fat sucrose diet (HFSD; n = 12) for 5 weeks. A comparative analysis by 2D-DIGE and LC-ESI-MS/MS was performed to characterize the liver protein expression profiles due to the three obesogenic diets. Results: Ten out of 17 proteins whose expression levels were altered by >1.25-fold were identified. Four proteins (Hspa8, Hspa9, Ca3, and Cat) were differentially expressed after the HFSD period compared to CD. The heat shock proteins (Hspa8 and Hspa9) resulted significantly downregulated in liver from rats fed HFSD versus CD (p < 0.05). The results were confirmed by Western blot. Conclusions: This descriptive study might be useful for further studies aiming at understanding the mechanisms by which diets rich in both fat and sugar affect the initiation of hepatic steatosis.

© 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: July 26, 2011
Accepted: December 13, 2011
Published online: February 25, 2012
Issue release date: March 2012

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1661-6499 (Print)
eISSN: 1661-6758 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/JNN


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