Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Original Paper

A Longitudinal Study Comparing Mutans Streptococci and Lactobacilli Colonisation in Dentate Children Aged 6 to 24 Months

Plonka K.A.a, b · Pukallus M.L.a, b · Barnett A.G.c · Walsh L.J.a · Holcombe T.F.b · Seow W.K.a

Author affiliations

aCentre for Paediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld., bOral Health Program (Logan-Beaudesert Division), Metro South Health Service District, Queensland Health, Logan, Qld., and cSchool of Public Health and Social Work & Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Qld., Australia

Related Articles for ""

Caries Res 2012;46:385–393

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: April 03, 2012
Accepted: April 05, 2012
Published online: June 12, 2012
Issue release date: July 2012

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 0008-6568 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-976X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CRE

Abstract

This longitudinal study aimed to investigate variables associated with colonisation of mutans streptococci (MS) compared with lactobacilli (LB) colonisation in a cohort of children (n = 214) from the time of first tooth eruption at approximately 6 months until 24 months of age. Repeated plaque and salivary samples were collected from the same infants at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months and assayed for MS and LB using a microbiological culture kit. Children having both MS and LB increased from 4% at 6 months to 13% at 12 and 18 months to 20% at 24 months (p = 0.004). LB presence at 6 months was correlated with MS presence at 12, 18 and 24 months (r = 0.21 to r = 0.46, p = 0.02), while MS presence at 6 months correlated with LB presence at all other times (r = 0.19 to r = 0.31, p = 0.03). At 6 and 12 months, the key variables for MS colonisation included unrestored dental cavities in the mother (p = 0.03), mother not persisting with toothbrushing (p = 0.001) and bottle taken to bed at night (p = 0.033), while the only significant variable for LB colonisation was natural birth (p = 0.01). At 24 months, the significant variables for MS colonisation were condiments added to pacifier (p = 0.022) and child being uncooperative for toothbrushing (p = 0.025), while the significant variables for LB colonisation were pregnancy problems (p = 0.028) and child being uncooperative for toothbrushing (p = 0.013). The ages 6–12 months thus represent a time period when key variables may be controlled to reduce MS and LB colonisation.

© 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel


References

  1. Alaluusua S, Renkonen OV: Streptococcus mutans establishment and dental caries experience in children from 2 to 4 years old. Scand J Dent Res 1983;91:453–457.
  2. Babaahmady KG, Challacombe SJ, Marsh PD, Newman HN: Ecological study of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus and Lactobacillus spp. At sub-sites from approximal dental plaque from children. Caries Res 1998;32:51–58.
  3. Beighton D: The complex oral microflora of high-risk individuals and groups and its role in the caries process. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2005;33:248–255.
  4. Caufield PW, Cutter GR, Dasanayake AP: Initial acquisition of mutans streptococci by infants: evidence for a discrete window of infectivity. J Dent Res 1993a;72:37–45.
  5. Caufield PW, Cutter GR, Dasanayake AP: Initial acquisition of mutans streptococci by infants. J Dent Res 1993b;72:37–45.
  6. Drury TF, Horowitz AM, Ismail AI, Maertens MP, Rozier RG, Selwitz RH: Diagnosing and reporting early childhood caries for research purposes. A report of a workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the Health Care Financing Administration. J Public Health Dent 1999;59:192–197.
  7. Du MQ, Tai BJ, Jiang H, Lo ECM, Fan MW, Bian Z: A two-year randomized clinical trial of chlorhexidine varnish on dental caries in Chinese preschool children. J Dent Res 2006;85:557–559.
  8. Law V, Seow WK: A longitudinal controlled study of factors associated with mutans streptococci infection and caries lesion initiation in children 21 to 72 months old. Pediatr Dent 2006;28:58–65.
    External Resources
  9. Loesche WJ: Role of Streptococcus mutans in human dental decay. Microbiol Rev 1986;50:353–380.
  10. Lopez L, Berkowitz R, Spiekerman C, Weinstein P: Topical antimicrobial therapy in the prevention of early childhood caries: a follow-up report. Pediatr Dent 2002;24:204–206.
    External Resources
  11. Milgrom P, Ly KA, Tut OK, Mancl L, Roberts MC, Briand K, Gancio MJ: Xylitol pediatric topical oral syrup to prevent dental caries: a double-blind randomized clinical trial of efficacy. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2009;163:601–607.
  12. Milgrom P, Riedy CA, Weinstein P, Tanner AC, Manibusan L, Bruss J: Dental caries and its relationship to bacterial infection, hypoplasia, diet, and oral hygiene in 6- to 36-month-old children. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2000;28:295–306.
  13. Sanders A, Spencer AJ, Slade GD: Evaluating the role of dental behaviour in oral health inequalities. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2006;34:71–79.
  14. Schou L, Uitenbroek D: Social and behavioural indicators of caries experience in 5-year-old children. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 1995;23:276–281.
  15. Seow WK, Cheng E, Wan V: Effects of oral health education and tooth-brushing on mutans streptococci infection in young children. Pediatr Dent 2003;25:223–228.
    External Resources
  16. Söderling E, Isokangas P, Pienihäkkinen K, Tenovuo J, Alanen P: Influence of maternal xylitol consumption on mother-child transmission of mutans streptococci: 6-year follow-up. Caries Res 2001;35:173–177.
  17. Tanabe Y, Park JH, Tinanoff N, Turng BF, Lilli H, Minah GE: Comparison of chairside microbiological screening systems and conventional selective media in children with and without visible dental caries. Pediatr Dent 2006;28:363–368.
  18. Tanner AC, Mathney JM, Kent RL, Chalmers NI, Hughes V, Loo CY, Pradhan N, Kanasi E, Hwang J, Dahlan MA, Papadopolou E, Dewhirst FE: Cultivable anaerobic microbiota of severe early childhood caries. J Clin Microbiol 2011;49:1464–1474.
  19. Teanpaisan R, Thitasomakul S, Piwat S, Thearmontree A, Pithpornchaiyakul W, Chankanka O: Longitudinal study of the presence of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in relation to dental caries development in 3- to 24-month-old Thai children. Int Dent J 2007;57:445–451.
  20. Thitasomakul S, Piwat S, Thearmontree A, Chankanka O, Pithpornchaiyakul W, Madyusoh S: Risks for early childhood caries analyzed by negative binomial models. J Dent Res 2009;88:137–141.
  21. Thitasomakul S, Thearmontree A, Piwat S, Chankanka O, Pithpornchaiyakul W, Teanpaisan R, Madyusoh S: A longitudinal study of early childhood caries in 9- to 18-month-old Thai infants. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2006;34:429–436.
    External Resources
  22. Wan AKL, Seow WK, Purdie DM, Bird PS, Walsh LJ, Tudehope DI: A longitudinal study of Streptococcus mutans colonization in infants after tooth eruption. J Dent Res 2003;82:504–508.
  23. Weintraub JA, Ramos-Gomez F, Jue B, Shain S, Hoover CI, Featherstone JDB, Gansky SA: Fluoride varnish efficacy in preventing early childhood caries. J Dent Res 2006;85:172–176.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: April 03, 2012
Accepted: April 05, 2012
Published online: June 12, 2012
Issue release date: July 2012

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 0008-6568 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-976X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CRE


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.