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Original Paper

Elevated Serum IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, CRP, and IFN-γ Levels in 10- to 11-Year-Old Boys with Increased BMI

Utsal L.a · Tillmann V.d · Zilmer M.b · Mäestu J.a · Purge P.a · Jürimäe J.a · Saar M.a · Lätt E.a · Maasalu K.c · Jürimäe T.a

Author affiliations

aFaculty of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Departments of bBiochemistry and cTraumatology and Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, and dDepartment of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Children’s Clinic of Tartu University Hospital, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia

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Horm Res Paediatr 2012;78:31–39

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: December 07, 2011
Accepted: May 31, 2012
Published online: July 23, 2012
Issue release date: August 2012

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 6

ISSN: 1663-2818 (Print)
eISSN: 1663-2826 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/HRP

Abstract

Background/Aims: Many inflammation parameters are associated with obesity, but few comparable data are found in youth. This study aims to characterize the differences in serum levels of 13 biochemical inflammatory markers between boys with increased BMI and boys with normal BMI, and examine the relationships between inflammation markers, skinfold thicknesses, and body composition. Participants/Methods: The participants were 38 boys (BMI above 85th percentile) and 38 boys (normal BMI) at the age of 10–11 years. Measurements included BMI, 9 skinfold thicknesses, waist and hip circumferences, and total body and trunk fat mass and percentage as indices of obesity, fasting insulin, glucose, and serum concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, VEGF, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-1β, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), epidermal growth factor, and CRP. Results: Overweight boys (OWB) were taller and more frequently in puberty than normal-weight boys (NWB). Skinfold thicknesses and body composition parameters were higher in OWB. They had significantly higher serum IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and CRP values compared to NWB. Conclusions: Six of 13 measured biochemical markers were significantly increased in OWB, indicating that many low-grade inflammatory processes are already involved in the development of obesity in childhood.

© 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: December 07, 2011
Accepted: May 31, 2012
Published online: July 23, 2012
Issue release date: August 2012

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 6

ISSN: 1663-2818 (Print)
eISSN: 1663-2826 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/HRP


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