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Original Paper

Quality of Life after Stroke: Evaluation of the Greek SAQOL-39g

Efstratiadou E.A. · Chelas E.N. · Ignatiou M. · Christaki V. · Papathanasiou I. · Hilari K.

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Division of Language and Communication Science, City University London, London, UK

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Folia Phoniatr Logop 2012;64:179–186

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: October 25, 2012
Issue release date: October 2012

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 1021-7762 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9972 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPL

Abstract

Background/Aims: Stroke and aphasia rehabilitation aims to improve people’s quality of life. Yet, scales for measuring health-related quality of life in stroke typically exclude people with aphasia. They are also primarily available in English. An exception is the 39-item generic version of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale (SAQOL-39g). This scale has been tested with people with aphasia; it has been adapted for use in many countries including Greece. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Greek SAQOL-39g. Methods: An interview-based psychometric study was carried out. Participants completed: receptive subtests of the Frenchay Aphasia Screening Test, the Greek SAQOL-39g, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, the Frenchay Activities Index, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and the Barthel Index. Results: 86 people took part; 26 provided test-retest reliability data. The Greek SAQOL-39g demonstrated excellent acceptability (minimal missing data; no floor/ceiling effects), test-retest reliability [intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.96 (overall scale), 0.83–0.99 (domains)] and internal consistency [Cronbach’s alpha = 0.96 (overall scale), 0.92–0.96 (domains)]. There was strong evidence for convergent [r = 0.53–0.80 (overall scale), 0.54–0.89 (domains)] and discriminant validity [r = 0.52 (overall scale), 0.04–0.48 (domains)]. Conclusion: The Greek SAQOL-39g is a valid and reliable scale. It is a promising measure for use in stroke and aphasia treatment prioritization, outcome measurement and service evaluation.

© 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: October 25, 2012
Issue release date: October 2012

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 1021-7762 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9972 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPL


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