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Nutrition in Intensive Care Medicine: Beyond Physiology

Editor(s): Singer P. (Petah Tikva) 
Cover

How Can Nutrition Interfere with Outcome?

Glutamine

Kim M. · Wischmeyer P.E.

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Department of Anesthesiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colo., USA

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Singer P (ed): Nutrition in Intensive Care Medicine: Beyond Physiology. World Rev Nutr Diet. Basel, Karger, 2013, vol 105, pp 90–96

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of How Can Nutrition Interfere with Outcome?

Published online: October 12, 2012
Cover Date: 2013

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-318-02227-8 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-02228-5 (Online)

Abstract

Glutamine (GLN) has been shown to be a key pharmaconutrient in the body’s response to stress and injury. It exerts its protective effects via multiple mechanisms, including direct protection of cells and tissue from injury, attenuation inflammation, and preservation of metabolic function. Data support GLN as an ideal pharmacologic intervention to prevent or treat multiple organ dysfunction syndrome after sepsis or other injuries in the intensive care unit (ICU) population. A large and growing body of clinical data shows that GLN can be a life-saving intervention in well-defined critically ill patient groups. Recent data has helped clarify that GLN shows the greatest benefit when administered at doses greater than 0.35 g/kg/day, with optimal benefit potentially occurring at 0.5 g/kg/day. Further, it appears that when possible GLN should be administered for longer than 5 days and more ideally for the entire period of ICU or hospital stay. Finally, ongoing clinical trials may prove GLN administration in the first 24–48 h following ICU admission and via both the enteral and parenteral route are key to optimizing patient outcomes with this therapy.

© 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of How Can Nutrition Interfere with Outcome?

Published online: October 12, 2012
Cover Date: 2013

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-318-02227-8 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-02228-5 (Online)


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.