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Original Article

Group Size of a Permanent Large Group of Agile Mangabeys (Cercocebus agilis) at Bai Hokou, Central African Republic

Devreese L.a · Huynen M.-C.a · Stevens J.M.G.b · Todd A.c

Author affiliations

aBehavioural Biology Unit, University of Liège, Liège, and bCentre for Research and Conservation, Antwerp, Belgium; cDzanga-Sangha Project, Bayanga, Central African Republic

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Folia Primatol 2013;84:67-73

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: July 30, 2012
Accepted: December 27, 2012
Published online: March 20, 2013
Issue release date: June 2013

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR

Abstract

White-eyelid mangabeys (genus Cercocebus) live in groups of highly variable size. Because of their semi-terrestrial behaviour and preference for dense forest habitats, re-liable data on group size are scarce. During a 5-month study, we collected 17 group counts on a habituated group of agile mangabeys (C. agilis) at Bai Hokou in the Central African Republic. We found a stable group size of approximately 135 individuals. This permanent large grouping pattern is known to occur among several populations of white-eyelid mangabeys and is congruent with extreme group sizes reported in mandrills at Lopé in Gabon.

© 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: July 30, 2012
Accepted: December 27, 2012
Published online: March 20, 2013
Issue release date: June 2013

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR


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