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Limits of Human Endurance

76th Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop, Oxford, August 2012

Editor(s): van Loon L.J.C. (Maastricht) 
Meeusen R. (Brussels) 
Cover

Physiological and Performance Adaptations to High-Intensity Interval Training

Gibala M.J.a · Jones A.M.b

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; bDepartment of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK

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van Loon LJC, Meeusen R (eds): Limits of Human Endurance. Nestlé Nutr Inst Workshop Ser. Nestec Ltd. Vevey/S. Karger AG Basel, © 2013, vol 76, pp 51-60

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of  

Published online: July 25, 2013
Cover Date: 2013

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-318-02408-1 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-02409-8 (Online)

Abstract

High-intensity interval training (HIIT) refers to exercise that is characterized by relatively short bursts of vigorous activity, interspersed by periods of rest or low-intensity exercise for recovery. In untrained and recreationally active individuals, short-term HIIT is a potent stimulus to induce physiological remodeling similar to traditional endurance training despite a markedly lower total exercise volume and training time commitment. As little as six sessions of ‘all-out' HIIT over 14 days, totaling ∼15 min of intense cycle exercise within total training time commitment of ∼2.5 h, is sufficient to enhance exercise capacity and improve skeletal muscle oxidative capacity. From an athletic standpoint, HIIT is also an effective strategy to improve performance when supplemented into the already high training volumes of well-trained endurance athletes, although the underlying mechanisms are likely different compared to less trained subjects. Most studies in this regard have examined the effect of replacing a portion (typically ∼15-25%) of base/normal training with HIIT (usually 2-3 sessions per week for 4-8 weeks). It has been proposed that a polarized approach to training, in which ∼75% of total training volume be performed at low intensities, with 10-15% performed at very high intensities may be the optimal training intensity distribution for elite athletes who compete in intense endurance events.

© 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of  

Published online: July 25, 2013
Cover Date: 2013

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-318-02408-1 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-02409-8 (Online)


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