Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Original Paper

Deterioration of Gait and Balance over Time: The Effects of Age-Related White Matter Change - The LADIS Study

Kreisel S.H.a · Blahak C.a · Bäzner H.b · Inzitari D.c · Pantoni L.c · Poggesi A.c · Chabriat H.d · Erkinjuntti T.e · Fazekas F.f · Ferro J.M.g · Langhorne P.h · O'Brien J.i · Scheltens P.j · Visser M.C.j · Wahlund L.-O.k · Waldemar G.l · Wallin A.m · Hennerici M.G.a · on behalf of the LADIS study group (see Appendix)

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Neurology, University of Heidelberg, UniversitätsMedizin Mannheim, Mannheim, and bDepartment of Neurology, Klinikum Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany; cDepartment of Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; dDepartment of Neurology, Hôpital Lariboisière, Paris, France; eDepartment of Neurology, Helsinki University Central Hospital and Department of Neurological Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; fDepartment of Neurology and MRI Institute, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria; gServiço de Neurologia, Centro de Estudos Egas Moniz, Hospital de Santa Maria Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal; hAcademic Department for Geriatric Medicine, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, and iInstitute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK; jDepartment of Radiology and Neurology, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; kKarolinska Institute, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Huddinge, Sweden; lMemory Disorders Research Unit, Department of Neurology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; mInstitute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden

Related Articles for ""

Cerebrovasc Dis 2013;35:544-553

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information










I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information










I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: December 20, 2012
Accepted: March 04, 2013
Published online: July 06, 2013
Issue release date: July 2013

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1015-9770 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9786 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CED

Abstract

Background: Cross-sectional studies have shown an association between the severity of age-related white matter change (ARWMC) and lower body motor function. However, the association between prevalent ARWMC and incident deterioration of balance and gait remains insufficiently investigated. This study investigates if the degree of prevalent ARWMC has a differential effect on lower body motor function as it changes over time, hypothesizing that individuals with more severe baseline white matter pathology experience greater clinical deterioration independent of potential confounders. This is of clinical relevance: given the increasing use of neuroimaging, incidental white matter pathology is common; being able to delineate natural trajectories of balance and gait function given ARWMC may improve patient advice and help optimize allocation of care. Methods: 639 non-disabled elderly individuals with prevalent ARWMC (grading of severity of ARWMC using the Fazekas scale) were followed up yearly for 3 years, as part of the Leukoaraiosis and Disability Study. The primary outcome variable, reflecting the temporal course of gait and balance function, was the change of scores on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) over time versus the severity of ARWMC. We used linear mixed modelling to analyse change over time. Explorative analysis was carried out investigating the effect of age on potential deterioration of gait and balance function. We used propensity scores to adjust for multiple confounders that affect both the exposure (i.e. ARWMC) and outcome. Results: Subjects' lower body motor function deteriorated by 2.6% per year. However, after adjustment for baseline motor impairment and potential confounders, only subjects with moderate [-0.22 points per year on the SPPB (equals -2.3%); 95% CI -0.35 to -0.09, p < 0.001] or severe [-0.46 points per year (equals -4.7%); 95% CI -0.63 to -0.28, p < 0.0001] ARWMC show a loss of function. Age shows differential effects: relatively younger elderly subjects have similar temporal dynamics in SPPB change independent of their individual degree of ARWMC severity; however, subjects with severe ARWMC and who are older than 75.9 years deteriorate significantly more rapidly than their counterparts with only mild or moderate white matter pathology. Conclusion: Only moderate and severe ARWMC is independently associated - on average - with a deterioration of gait and balance. Albeit the possibility of unmeasured confounding and other methodological constraints, there is nonetheless evidence of large interindividual variability: some subjects with moderate or severe ARWMC stay stable over time or even show improvement. Furthermore, there is explorative analysis showing that younger elderly subjects may be able to better compensate even severe ARWMC. These individuals' gait and balance function stays relatively stable over time, whereas their older counterparts deteriorate significantly. This may point towards a threshold effect given ARWMC.

© 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: December 20, 2012
Accepted: March 04, 2013
Published online: July 06, 2013
Issue release date: July 2013

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1015-9770 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9786 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CED


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.