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Original Paper

Early Surfactant Guided by Lamellar Body Counts on Gastric Aspirate in Very Preterm Infants

Verder H.a · Ebbesen F.e · Fenger-Grøn J.g · Henriksen T.B.f · Andreasson B.j · Bender L.e · Bertelsen A.a · Björklund L.J.k · Dahl M.h · Esberg G.f · Eschen C.a · Høvring M.a · Kreft A.i · Kroner J.h · Lundberg F.j · Pedersen P.c · Reinholdt J.b · Stanchev H.d

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Pediatrics, Holbæk Hospital, Holbæk, bDepartment of Neonatology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, cDepartment of Pediatrics, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, dDepartment of Pediatrics, University of Copenhagen, Næstved, eDepartment of Pediatrics, Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg, fDepartment of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, gDepartment of Pediatrics, Kolding Hospital, Aarhus University, Aarhus, hDepartment of Pediatrics, Odense Hospital, Odense, and iDepartment of Pediatrics, Sønderborg Hospital, University of South Denmark, Sønderborg, Denmark, and jDepartment of Neonatology, Malmö, and kDepartment of Neonatology, Skåne University Hospital, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden

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Neonatology 2013;104:116-122

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: December 20, 2012
Accepted: April 18, 2013
Published online: July 09, 2013
Issue release date: August 2013

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 1661-7800 (Print)
eISSN: 1661-7819 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEO

Abstract

Background: We have developed a rapid method, based on lamellar body counts (LBC) on gastric aspirate, for identifying newborns who will develop respiratory distress syndrome with a need for surfactant supplementation. Objective: We set out to test whether it was possible to improve the outcome when used in a clinical trial. Methods: We randomly assigned 380 infants born at 24-29 weeks' gestation and supported with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) to receive surfactant guided either by LBC (intervention group) or increasing need for oxygen (control group). The primary outcome was mechanical ventilation or death within 5 days. Secondary outcomes included need for oxygen expressed by arterial to alveolar oxygen tension ratio (a/APO2) at the age of 6 h and need for oxygen at day 28. Results: The primary outcomes were equal (25%) in the two groups. The intervention group had higher a/APO2 than the control group at 6 h, median 0.64 versus 0.52 (p < 0.01), and the subgroup with gestational age 26-29 weeks needed fewer days of oxygen supplementation than the controls, median 2 vs. 9 days (p = 0.01), and fewer infants needed oxygen at day 28 (p = 0.04). Furthermore, there was a tendency in the intervention group towards a shorter duration of nCPAP. Too little or viscose aspirate in 23% of the cases was a limitation of the method. Conclusion: Using LBC test as indicator of lung maturity and early surfactant therapy in very preterm newborns, it is possible to reduce the need for oxygen supplementation.

© 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: December 20, 2012
Accepted: April 18, 2013
Published online: July 09, 2013
Issue release date: August 2013

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 1661-7800 (Print)
eISSN: 1661-7819 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEO


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