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Human Papillomavirus

Bench to Bedside

Editor(s): Ramírez-Fort M.K. (Houston, Tex.) 
Khan F. (Houston, Tex.) 
Rady P.L. (Houston, Tex.) 
Tyring S.K. (Houston, Tex.) 
Cover

Epidemiology and Clinical Manifestations

Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis

Burger B.a · Itin P.H.b

Author affiliations

Departments of aBiomedicine and bDermatology, University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland

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Ramírez-Fort MK, Khan F, Rady PL, Tyring SK (eds): Human Papillomavirus: Bench to Bedside. Curr Probl Dermatol. Basel, Karger, 2014, vol 45, pp 123-131

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Epidemiology and Clinical Manifestations

Published online: March 17, 2014
Cover Date: 2014

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISBN: 978-3-318-02526-2 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-02527-9 (Online)

Abstract

Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis that predisposes certain individuals to developing cutaneous malignancies caused by infectious agents. Mutations in the transmembrane channel gene TMC6 or TMC8 create patient susceptibility to infections by human papillomavirus (HPV) and the development of EV-typical plane warts. Mainly in the UV-exposed regions, affected individuals have a lifelong increased risk for the development of cutaneous malignancy, especially squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). EV is the first disease to correlate cancer and viral infection, therefore EV now serves as the cornerstone to our understanding of viral oncogenesis. The EV model of cutaneous SCC may be applied to the general population; it is suggested that the TMC mutations impair the immunity of the patients, supporting the amplification of specific HPV types. Despite several advances in our comprehension of EV, the pathogenesis of the disease is not well understood.

© 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Epidemiology and Clinical Manifestations

Published online: March 17, 2014
Cover Date: 2014

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISBN: 978-3-318-02526-2 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-02527-9 (Online)


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