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The Hippocampus in Clinical Neuroscience

Editor(s): Szabo K. (Mannheim) 
Hennerici M.G. (Mannheim) 
Cover

The Hippocampus in Neurological Disorders

Stress, Memory, and the Hippocampus

Wingenfeld K.a · Wolf O.T.b

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Psychiatry, Charité University Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, and bCognitive Psychology, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany

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Szabo K, Hennerici MG (eds): The Hippocampus in Clinical Neuroscience. Front Neurol Neurosci. Basel, Karger, 2014, vol 34, pp 109-120

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of The Hippocampus in Neurological Disorders

Published online: April 16, 2014
Cover Date: 2014

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-318-02567-5 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-02568-2 (Online)

Abstract

Stress hormones, i.e. cortisol in human and cortisone in rodents, influence a wide range of cognitive functions, including hippocampus-based declarative memory performance. Cortisol enhances memory consolidation, but impairs memory retrieval. In this context glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity and hippocampal integrity play an important role. This review integrates findings on the relationships between the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, one of the main coordinators of the stress response, hippocampus, and memory. Findings obtained in healthy participants will be compared with selected mental disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and borderline personality disorder (BPD). These disorders are characterized by alterations of the HPA axis and hippocampal dysfunctions. Interestingly, the acute effects of stress hormones on memory in psychiatric patients are different from those found in healthy humans. While cortisol administration has failed to affect memory retrieval in patients with MDD, patients with PTSD and BPD have been found to show enhanced rather than impaired memory retrieval after hydrocortisone. This indicates an altered sensitivity to stress hormones in these mental disorders.

© 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of The Hippocampus in Neurological Disorders

Published online: April 16, 2014
Cover Date: 2014

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-318-02567-5 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-02568-2 (Online)


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