Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Published: November 2013

Open Access Gateway

Cannabis Extract Treatment for Terminal Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with a Philadelphia Chromosome Mutation

Singh Y.a · Bali C.b

Author affiliations

aBrampton, Ont. and bAjax, Ont., Canada

Corresponding Author

Yadvinder Singh

44 Don Minaker Drive

Brampton, ON, L6P1R3 (Canada)

E-Mail y13singh@gmail.com

Related Articles for ""

Case Rep Oncol 2013;6:585-592

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Abstract

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of the white blood cells and is typically well treated with combination chemotherapy, with a remission state after 5 years of 94% in children and 30-40% in adults. To establish how aggressive the disease is, further chromosome testing is required to determine whether the cancer is myeloblastic and involves neutrophils, eosinophils or basophils, or lymphoblastic involving B or T lymphocytes. This case study is on a 14-year-old patient diagnosed with a very aggressive form of ALL (positive for the Philadelphia chromosome mutation). A standard bone marrow transplant, aggressive chemotherapy and radiation therapy were revoked, with treatment being deemed a failure after 34 months. Without any other solutions provided by conventional approaches aside from palliation, the family administered cannabinoid extracts orally to the patient. Cannabinoid resin extract is used as an effective treatment for ALL with a positive Philadelphia chromosome mutation and indications of dose-dependent disease control. The clinical observation in this study revealed a rapid dose-dependent correlation.

© 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel


References

  1. Guzman M: Cannabinoids: potential anti-cancer agent. Nat Rev Cancer 2003;3:745-755.
  2. Powles T, Poele RT, Shamash J, Chaplin T, Propper D, Joel S, Oliver T, Liu WM: Cannabis-induced cytotoxicity in leukemic cell lines: the role of the cannabinoid receptors and the MAPK pathway. Blood 2005;105:1214-1221.
  3. McKallip RJ, Jia W, Schlomer J, Warren JW, Nagarkatti PS, Nagarkatti M: Cannabidiol-induced apoptosis in human leukemia cells: a novel role of cannabidiol in the regulation of p22phox and Nox4 expression. Mol Pharmacol 2006;70:897-908.
  4. Murison G, Chubb C, Maeda S, Gemmell MA, Huberman E: Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci 1987;84:5414-5418.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Published: November 2013

Published online: November 28, 2013
Issue release date: September – December

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 0


eISSN: 1662-6575 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CRO


Open Access License / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Open Access License: This is an Open Access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (CC BY-NC) (www.karger.com/OA-license), applicable to the online version of the article only. Distribution permitted for non-commercial purposes only.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.