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Affects, Interoception and Psychopathology

Preclinical Modeling of Primal Emotional Affects (SEEKING, PANIC and PLAY): Gateways to the Development of New Treatments for Depression

Panksepp J.a · Yovell Y.b

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, Wash., USA; bInstitute for the Study of Affective Neuroscience, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel

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Psychopathology 2014;47:383-393

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Affects, Interoception and Psychopathology

Received: May 09, 2014
Accepted: July 21, 2014
Published online: October 22, 2014
Issue release date: November 2014

Number of Print Pages: 11
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0254-4962 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-033X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/PSP

Abstract

Mammalian brains contain at least 7 primal emotional systems - SEEKING, RAGE, FEAR, LUST, CARE, PANIC and PLAY (capitalization reflects a proposed primary-process terminology, to minimize semantic confusions and mereological fallacies). These systems help organisms feel affectively balanced (e.g. euthymic) and unbalanced (e.g. depressive, irritable, manic), providing novel insights for understanding human psychopathologies. Three systems are especially important for understanding depression: The separation distress (PANIC) system mediates the psychic pain of separation distress (i.e. excessive sadness and grief), which can be counteracted by minimizing PANIC arousals (as with low-dose opioids). Depressive dysphoria also arises from reduced brain reward-seeking and related play urges (namely diminished enthusiasm (SEEKING) and joyful exuberance (PLAY) which promote sustained amotivational states). We describe how an understanding of these fundamental emotional circuits can promote the development of novel antidepressive therapeutics - (i) low-dose buprenorphine to counteract depression and suicidal ideation emanating from too much psychic pain (PANIC overarousal), (ii) direct stimulation of the SEEKING system to counteract amotivational dysphoria, and (iii) the discovery and initial clinical testing of social-joy-promoting molecules derived from the analysis of the PLAY system.

© 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Affects, Interoception and Psychopathology

Received: May 09, 2014
Accepted: July 21, 2014
Published online: October 22, 2014
Issue release date: November 2014

Number of Print Pages: 11
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0254-4962 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-033X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/PSP


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