Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Original Article

Ecological Risk Aversion and Juvenile Ring-Tailed Lemur Feeding and Foraging

O'Mara M.T.

Author affiliations

Zukunftskolleg and Department of Biology, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, and Department of Migration and Immuno-Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Radolfzell, Germany; Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panamá, Panama

Related Articles for ""

Folia Primatol 2015;86:96-105

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Published online: May 19, 2015
Issue release date: May 2015

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR

Abstract

The extended primate juvenile period has been linked to interactions between feeding ecology and sociality. However, accumulating field data on juvenile primates suggest variation in the linkages between foraging efficiency, group foraging and social behaviour. In many non-human primates, juvenile ability (strength, coordination and motor skills) does not limit foraging success. If predicted limitations in feeding are not found in juvenile monkeys, it is possible that the gregarious strepsirrhines may show foraging patterns similar to those implicated in the evolution of a life history where long juvenile periods are advantageous. To test these behavioural predictions, I present a mixed longitudinal sample of observations on feeding and foraging behaviour from ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar. Like several platyrrhine species, close proximity during foraging, low feeding efficiency and low dietary diversity are not typical of ring-tailed lemurs. The lack of ecological trade-offs in these species may indicate stronger common roles of sociality and social complexity in structuring the elongation of the primate juvenile period.

© 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel


References

  1. Bezanson M (2009). Life history and locomotion in Cebus capucinus and Alouatta palliata. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 140: 508-517.
  2. Bezanson M, Morbeck M (2013). Future adults or old children? Integrating life history frameworks for understanding primate positional patterns. In Building Babies. Primate Development in Proximate and Ultimate Perspective (Clancy K, Hinde K, Rutherford J, eds.), pp 435-458. New York, Springer.
    External Resources
  3. Bolker B, Brooks M, Clark C, Geange S, Poulsen J, Stevens M, White J (2009). Generalized linear mixed models: a practical guide for ecology and evolution. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 24: 127-135.
  4. Coelho AM, Bramblett CA (1981). Interobserver agreement on a molecular ethogram of the genus Papio. Animal Behaviour 29: 443-448.
    External Resources
  5. Cuozzo FP, Sauther ML (2004). Tooth loss, survival, and resource use in wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta): implications for inferring conspecific care in fossil hominids. Journal of Human Evolution 46: 623-631.
  6. Eaglen RH (1985). Behavioral correlates of tooth eruption in Madagascar lemurs. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 66: 307-315.
    External Resources
  7. Fragaszy D (1990). Sex and age differences in the organization of behavior in wedge-capped capuchins, Cebus olivaceus. Behavioral Ecology 1: 81-94.
    External Resources
  8. Fragaszy DM, Boinski S (1995) Patterns of individual diet choice and efficiency of foraging in wedge-capped capuchin monkeys (Cebusolivaceus). Journal of Comparative Psychology 109: 339-348.
  9. Godfrey L, Samonds K, Jungers W, Sutherland M, Irwin M (2004). Ontogenetic correlates of diet in Malagasy lemurs. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 123: 250-276.
  10. Gould L, Sauther ML (2007). Anti-predator strategies in a diurnal prosimian, the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar. In Primate Anti-Predator Strategies (Gursky SL, Nekaris KAI, eds.), pp 275-288. New York, Springer.
    External Resources
  11. Gould L, Sussman RW, Sauther ML (2003). Demographic and life-history patterns in a population of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at Bezà Mahafaly Reserve, Madagascar: a 15-year perspective. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 120: 182-194.
  12. Gunst N, Boinski S, Fragaszy D (2008). Acquisition of foraging competence in wild brown capuchins (Cebus apella), with special reference to conspecifics' foraging artefacts as an indirect social influence. Behaviour 145: 195-229.
    External Resources
  13. Hanya G (2003). Age differences in food intake and dietary selection of wild male Japanese macaques. Primates 44: 333-339.
  14. Janson CH (1990). Ecological consequences of individual spatial choice in foraging groups of brown capuchin monkeys, Cebus apella. Animal Behaviour 40: 922-934.
    External Resources
  15. Janson CH (1998). Testing the predation hypothesis for vertebrate sociality: prospects and pitfalls. Behaviour 135: 389-410.
    External Resources
  16. Janson CH, van Schaik CP (1993). Ecological risk aversion in juvenile primates: slow and steady wins the race. In Juvenile Primates: Life History, Development and Behavior (Pereira ME, Fairbanks LA, eds.), pp 57-74. New York, Oxford University Press.
  17. Joffe TH (1997). Social pressures have selected for an extended juvenile period in primates. Journal of Human Evolution 32: 593-605.
  18. Johnson SE, Bock J (2004). Trade-offs in skill acquisition and time allocation among juvenile chacma baboons. Human Nature - An Interdisciplinary Biosocial Perspective 15: 45-62.
  19. Lonsdorf EV (2005). Sex differences in the development of termite-fishing skills in the wild chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii, of Gombe National Park, Tanzania. Animal Behaviour 70: 673-683.
    External Resources
  20. O'Mara MT, Hickey C (2012). Social influences on the development of ringtailed lemur feeding ecology. Animal Behaviour 84: 1547-1555.
    External Resources
  21. O'Mara MT, Hickey C (2014). The development of sex differences in ring-tailed lemur feeding. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 68: 1273-1286.
    External Resources
  22. Overdorff D, Merenlender A, Talata P, Telo A, Forward Z (1999). Life history of Eulemur fulvus rufus from 1988-1998 in southeastern Madagascar. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 108: 295-310.
  23. Pagel MD, Harvey PH (1993). Evolution of the juvenile period in mammals. In Juvenile Primates: Life History, Development, and Behavior (Pereira ME, Fairbanks LA, eds.), pp 28-37. New York, Oxford University Press.
  24. Pereira ME (1993). Juvenility in animals. In Juvenile Primates: Life History, Development, and Behavior (Pereira ME, Fairbanks LA, eds.), pp 17-27. New York, Oxford University Press.
  25. Pereira ME, Altmann J (1985). Development of social behavior in free-living nonhuman primates. In Nonhuman Primate Models for Human Growth and Development (Watts ES, ed.), pp 217-309. New York, Liss.
  26. Pereira ME, Leigh SR (2003). Modes of primate development. In Primate Life Histories and Socioecology (Kappeler PM, Pereira ME, eds.), pp 149-176. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.
  27. Pontzer H, Raichlen DA, Gordon AD, Schroepfer-Walker KK, Hare B, O'Neill MC, Muldoon KM, Dunsworth HM, Wood BM, Isler K, Burkart J, Irwin M, Shumaker RW, Lonsdorf EV, Ross SR (2014). Primate energy expenditure and life history. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 111: 1433-1437.
  28. R Core Development Team (2011). R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing. Vienna, R Foundation for Statistical Computing.
  29. Ross C, Jones K (1999). Socioecology and the evolution of primate reproductive rates. In Comparative Primate Socioecology (Lee PC, ed.), pp 73-110. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
    External Resources
  30. Sauther ML (1998). Interplay of phenology and reproduction in ring-tailed lemurs: implications for ring-tailed lemur conservation. Folia Primatologica 69: 309-320.
    External Resources
  31. Sauther M, Cuozzo F (2009). The impact of fallback foods on wild ring-tailed lemur biology: a comparison of intact and anthropogenically disturbed habitats. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 140: 671-686.
  32. Stone AI (2006). Foraging ontogeny is not linked to delayed maturation in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). Ethology 112: 105-115.
    External Resources
  33. Stone A (2007). Ecological risk aversion and foraging behaviors of juvenile squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). Ethology 113: 782-792.
    External Resources
  34. Van Noordwijk MA, Hemelrijk CK, Herremans LA, Sterck EH (1993). Spatial position and behavioural sex differences in juvenile long-tailed macaques. In Juvenile Primates: Life History, Development, and Behavior (Pereira ME, Fairbanks LA, eds.), pp 77-85. New York, Oxford University Press.
  35. Wright PC (1999). Lemur traits and Madagascar ecology: coping with an island environment. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 42: 31-72.
  36. Yamashita N (2002). Diets of two lemur species in different microhabitats in Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar. International Journal of Primatology 23: 1025-1051.
    External Resources

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Published online: May 19, 2015
Issue release date: May 2015

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.