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Research Article

Free Access

Multinucleated Giant Hemocytes Are Effector Cells in Cell-Mediated Immune Responses of Drosophila

Márkus R.a · Lerner Z.a · Honti V.a · Csordás G.a · Zsámboki J.a · Cinege G.a · Párducz Á.b · Lukacsovich T.c · Kurucz É.a · Andó I.a

Author affiliations

aImmunology Unit, Institute of Genetics, and bLaboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, Institute of Biophysics, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, Hungary; cDepartment of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Irvine, Calif., USA

Corresponding Author

Dr. István Andó or Dr. Éva Kurucz

Immunology Unit, Institute of Genetics, Biological Research Centre

Hungarian Academy of Sciences

HU-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

E-Mail ando@brc.hu or kurucz@brc.hu

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J Innate Immun 2015;7:340-353

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Abstract

We identified and characterized a so far unrecognized cell type, dubbed the multinucleated giant hemocyte (MGH), in the ananassae subgroup of Drosophilidae. Here, we describe the functional and ultrastructural characteristics of this novel blood cell type as well as its characterization with a set of discriminative immunological markers. MGHs are encapsulating cells that isolate and kill the parasite without melanization. They share some properties with but differ considerably from lamellocytes, the encapsulating cells of Drosophila melanogaster, the broadly used model organism in studies of innate immunity. MGHs are nonproliferative effector cells that are derived from phagocytic cells of the sessile tissue and the circulation, but do not exhibit phagocytic activity. In contrast to lamellocytes, MGHs are gigantic cells with filamentous projections and contain many nuclei, which are the result of the fusion of several cells. Although the structure of lamellocytes and MGHs differ remarkably, their function in the elimination of parasites is similar, which is potentially the result of the convergent evolution of interactions between hosts and parasites in different geographic regions. MGHs are highly motile and share several features with mammalian multinucleated giant cells, a syncytium of macrophages formed during granulomatous inflammation.

© 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Research Article

Received: September 24, 2014
Accepted: November 06, 2014
Published online: February 06, 2015
Issue release date: June 2015

Number of Print Pages: 14
Number of Figures: 7
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1662-811X (Print)
eISSN: 1662-8128 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/JIN


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